Shade avoidance: phytochrome signalling and other aboveground neighbour detection cues.

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Serval ID
serval:BIB_B45F2BD0CB42
Type
Article: article from journal or magazin.
Publication sub-type
Review (review): journal as complete as possible of one specific subject, written based on exhaustive analyses from published work.
Collection
Publications
Institution
Title
Shade avoidance: phytochrome signalling and other aboveground neighbour detection cues.
Journal
Journal of Experimental Botany
Author(s)
Pierik R., de Wit M.
ISSN
1460-2431 (Electronic)
ISSN-L
0022-0957
Publication state
Published
Issued date
2014
Volume
65
Number
11
Pages
2815-2824
Language
english
Abstract
Plants compete with neighbouring vegetation for limited resources. In competition for light, plants adjust their architecture to bring the leaves higher in the vegetation where more light is available than in the lower strata. These architectural responses include accelerated elongation of the hypocotyl, internodes and petioles, upward leaf movement (hyponasty), and reduced shoot branching and are collectively referred to as the shade avoidance syndrome. This review discusses various cues that plants use to detect the presence and proximity of neighbouring competitors and respond to with the shade avoidance syndrome. These cues include light quality and quantity signals, mechanical stimulation, and plant-emitted volatile chemicals. We will outline current knowledge about each of these signals individually and discuss their possible interactions. In conclusion, we will make a case for a whole-plant, ecophysiology approach to identify the relative importance of the various neighbour detection cues and their possible interactions in determining plant performance during competition.
Pubmed
Web of science
Open Access
Yes
Create date
05/08/2014 17:57
Last modification date
25/09/2019 6:10
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