Shift in beneficial interactions during crop evolution.

Details

Serval ID
serval:BIB_B3519D30B2DF
Type
Article: article from journal or magazin.
Publication sub-type
Review (review): journal as complete as possible of one specific subject, written based on exhaustive analyses from published work.
Collection
Publications
Institution
Title
Shift in beneficial interactions during crop evolution.
Journal
Evolutionary applications
Author(s)
Fréville H., Montazeaud G., Forst E., David J., Papa R., Tenaillon M.I.
ISSN
1752-4571 (Print)
ISSN-L
1752-4571
Publication state
Published
Issued date
06/2022
Peer-reviewed
Oui
Volume
15
Number
6
Pages
905-918
Language
english
Notes
Publication types: Journal Article ; Review
Publication Status: epublish
Abstract
Plant domestication can be viewed as a form of co-evolved interspecific mutualism between humans and crops for the benefit of the two partners. Here, we ask how this plant-human mutualism has, in turn, impacted beneficial interactions within crop species, between crop species, and between crops and their associated microbial partners. We focus on beneficial interactions resulting from three main mechanisms that can be promoted by manipulating genetic diversity in agrosystems: niche partitioning, facilitation, and kin selection. We show that a combination of factors has impacted either directly or indirectly plant-plant interactions during domestication and breeding, with a trend toward reduced benefits arising from niche partitioning and facilitation. Such factors include marked decrease of molecular and functional diversity of crops and other organisms present in the agroecosystem, mass selection, and increased use of chemical inputs. For example, the latter has likely contributed to the relaxation of selection pressures on nutrient-mobilizing traits such as those associated to root exudation and plant nutrient exchanges via microbial partners. In contrast, we show that beneficial interactions arising from kin selection have likely been promoted since the advent of modern breeding. We highlight several issues that need further investigation such as whether crop phenotypic plasticity has evolved and could trigger beneficial interactions in crops, and whether human-mediated selection has impacted cooperation via kin recognition. Finally, we discuss how plant breeding and agricultural practices can help promoting beneficial interactions within and between species in the context of agroecology where the mobilization of diversity and complexity of crop interactions is viewed as a keystone of agroecosystem sustainability.
Keywords
agroecology, biotic interactions, facilitation, kin selection, niche complementarity, plant breeding
Pubmed
Web of science
Open Access
Yes
Create date
12/07/2022 11:26
Last modification date
20/07/2022 6:39
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