High coverage of hepatitis B vaccination and low prevalence of chronic hepatitis B in migrant children dictate a new catch-up vaccination strategy.

Details

Serval ID
serval:BIB_B302EDA6F4F1
Type
Article: article from journal or magazin.
Collection
Publications
Institution
Title
High coverage of hepatitis B vaccination and low prevalence of chronic hepatitis B in migrant children dictate a new catch-up vaccination strategy.
Journal
Vaccine
Author(s)
Fougère Y., El Houss S., Suris J.C., Rouvenaz-Defago S., Miletto D., Von der Weid L., Willen F., Williams-Smith J.A., Gehri M., Crisinel P.A.
ISSN
1873-2518 (Electronic)
ISSN-L
0264-410X
Publication state
Published
Issued date
16/07/2018
Peer-reviewed
Oui
Volume
36
Number
30
Pages
4501-4506
Language
english
Notes
Publication types: Journal Article ; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Publication Status: ppublish
Abstract
Worldwide coverage of hepatitis B (HB) vaccination is increasing. This should be considered when determining the best strategy for catch-up HB vaccination in migrant children, who rarely have written proof of past immunizations. This study aimed to estimate HB vaccine protection, chronic HB prevalence and to identify determinants of vaccine protection.
Newly arrived migrant children at Lausanne University Hospital from October 2014 to July 2017 were prospectively enrolled. Children and adolescents aged 1-18 years were approached for inclusion if they had no proof of past vaccinations and accepted a single dose of injected HB vaccine. HB surface antibody (anti-HBs) serology was performed after 4-6 weeks. Anti-HBs ≥100 IU/L were considered consistent with a booster-type antibody response. Patients with anti-HBs <100 IU/L received additional dose(s) of HB vaccine, after exclusion of chronic HB in children with anti-HBs <10 IU/L. Potential determinants of vaccine response were compared between children with and without booster-type response.
Two hundred children were available for analysis. Median age was 8.9 years (IQR 4.8-12.9), and 97 (49%) were female. The majority (n = 124, 62%) came from the region classified by the WHO as eastern Mediterranean. One hundred and sixty-one children (81%) had a booster-type antibody response. Only 1 patient (<1%) had chronic HB. In the multivariate analysis, younger age (OR per decreasing-year, 1.28; 95%CI, 1.05-1.57; p = 0.017) and migration from an urban area (OR 1.16; 95%CI, 1.01-1.33; p = 0.043) were the only significant determinants of booster-type response.
Post-vaccine serology may be used to identify a high proportion of individuals in our pediatric migrant population with previous immunization for HB. Our study also showed extremely low prevalence of chronic HB. No variable could definitively determine the results of serology. Post-vaccine serology represents the most effective strategy in this context of high vaccine coverage.
Keywords
Child, Child, Preschool, Female, Hepatitis B Vaccines/therapeutic use, Hepatitis B, Chronic/epidemiology, Hepatitis B, Chronic/immunology, Hepatitis B, Chronic/prevention & control, Humans, Immunization, Secondary, Male
Pubmed
Web of science
Create date
23/07/2018 17:34
Last modification date
20/08/2019 16:21
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