Overcoming the unitary exploration of binge-watching: A cluster analytical approach

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License: CC BY-NC 4.0
Serval ID
serval:BIB_B1B028184630
Type
Article: article from journal or magazin.
Collection
Publications
Institution
Title
Overcoming the unitary exploration of binge-watching: A cluster analytical approach
Journal
Journal of Behavioral Addictions
Author(s)
Flayelle Maèva, Maurage Pierre, Karila Laurent, Vögele Claus, Billieux Joël
ISSN
2062-5871
2063-5303
Publication state
Published
Issued date
01/09/2019
Peer-reviewed
Oui
Volume
8
Number
3
Pages
586-602
Language
english
Abstract
Background and aims: Binge-watching (i.e., watching multiple episodes of a TV series in one session) has recently
become standard practice among TV series viewers; this expansion generates concerns regarding the potential
negative outcomes associated with this habit. However, the investigation of its psychological correlates remains
fragmentary, with few initial studies a priori conceptualizing this behavior as a new addictive disorder. This study
explored these psychological correlates using cluster analysis of binge-watching behavior based on three key
psychological factors: motivations, impulsivity, and emotional reactivity. Methods: An online survey was completed
by 4,039 TV series viewers. Data were analyzed using hierarchical and non-hierarchical cluster analyses, the validity
of the clusters being finally determined through mutual comparisons with a selection of external correlates.
Results: Four clusters were identified: recreational TV series viewers (presenting low involvement in binge-watching),
regulated binge-watchers (moderately involved), avid binge-watchers (presenting elevated but non-problematic
involvement), and unregulated binge-watchers (presenting potentially problematic involvement associated with
negative outcomes). Discussion and conclusions: This study underlines the heterogeneous and multidetermined nature
of binge-watching. Our findings suggest that high engagement in binge-watching is distinct from problematic
binge-watching, thus reinforcing the notion that conceptualizing binge-watching as an addictive disorder is of low
relevance and might actually lead to the overpathologization of this highly popular leisure activity
Keywords
Medicine (miscellaneous), Clinical Psychology, Psychiatry and Mental health, General Medicine, Binge-Watching, Behavioral Addictions
Pubmed
Web of science
Open Access
Yes
Create date
31/10/2019 16:05
Last modification date
08/05/2021 6:32
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