Unique versus shared associations between self-reported behavioral addictions and substance use disorders and mental health problems: A commonality analysis in a large sample of young Swiss men.

Details

Serval ID
serval:BIB_B1265BF8F765
Type
Article: article from journal or magazin.
Collection
Publications
Institution
Title
Unique versus shared associations between self-reported behavioral addictions and substance use disorders and mental health problems: A commonality analysis in a large sample of young Swiss men.
Journal
Journal of behavioral addictions
Author(s)
Marmet S., Studer J., Wicki M., Bertholet N., Khazaal Y., Gmel G.
ISSN
2063-5303 (Electronic)
ISSN-L
2062-5871
Publication state
Published
Issued date
01/12/2019
Peer-reviewed
Oui
Volume
8
Number
4
Pages
664-677
Language
english
Notes
Publication types: Journal Article
Publication Status: ppublish
Abstract
Behavioral addictions (BAs) and substance use disorders (SUDs) tend to co-occur; both are associated with mental health problems (MHPs). This study aimed to estimate the proportion of variance in the severity of MHPs explained by BAs and SUDs, individually and shared between addictions.
A sample of 5,516 young Swiss men (mean = 25.47 years old; SD = 1.26) completed a self-reporting questionnaire assessing alcohol, cannabis, and tobacco use disorders, illicit drug use other than cannabis, six BAs (Internet, gaming, smartphone, Internet sex, gambling, and work) and four MHPs (major depression, attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder, social anxiety disorder, and borderline personality disorder). Commonality analysis was used to decompose the variance in the severity of MHPs explained (R <sup>2</sup> ) by BAs and SUDs into independent commonality coefficients. These were calculated for unique BA and SUD contributions and for all types of shared contributions.
BAs and SUDs explained between a fifth and a quarter of the variance in severity of MHPs, but individual addictions explained only about half of this explained variance uniquely; the other half was shared between addictions. A greater proportion of variance was explained uniquely or shared within BAs compared to SUDs, especially for social anxiety disorder.
The interactions of a broad range of addictions should be considered when investigating their associations with MHPs. BAs explain a larger part of the variance in MHPs than do SUDs and therefore play an important role in their interaction with MHPs.
Keywords
Adult, Anxiety Disorders/epidemiology, Attention Deficit Disorder with Hyperactivity/epidemiology, Behavior, Addictive/epidemiology, Borderline Personality Disorder/epidemiology, Cohort Studies, Comorbidity, Depressive Disorder, Major/epidemiology, Gambling/epidemiology, Humans, Internet, Male, Substance-Related Disorders/epidemiology, Switzerland/epidemiology, Young Adult, Switzerland, behavioral addictions, commonality analysis, mental health, substance use disorders
Pubmed
Web of science
Open Access
Yes
Create date
03/01/2020 21:19
Last modification date
07/07/2020 5:20
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