Recurrence of Hepatitis B Infection in Liver Transplant Patients Receiving Long-Term Hepatitis B Immunoglobulin Prophylaxis.

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Version: Final published version
License: CC BY-NC-ND 4.0
Serval ID
serval:BIB_ADD6E18857F6
Type
Article: article from journal or magazin.
Collection
Publications
Institution
Title
Recurrence of Hepatitis B Infection in Liver Transplant Patients Receiving Long-Term Hepatitis B Immunoglobulin Prophylaxis.
Journal
Annals of transplantation
Author(s)
Beckebaum S., Herzer K., Bauhofer A., Gelson W., De Simone P., de Man R., Engelmann C., Müllhaupt B., Vionnet J., Salizzoni M., Volpes R., Ercolani G., De Carlis L., Angeli P., Burra P., Dufour J.F., Rossi M., Cillo U., Neumann U., Fischer L., Niemann G., Toti L., Tisone G.
ISSN
2329-0358 (Electronic)
ISSN-L
1425-9524
Publication state
Published
Issued date
13/11/2018
Peer-reviewed
Oui
Volume
23
Pages
789-801
Language
english
Notes
Publication types: Journal Article ; Multicenter Study ; Observational Study
Publication Status: epublish
Abstract
BACKGROUND Long-term real-world data are relatively sparse regarding recurrence of chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection after liver transplantation using hepatitis B immunoglobulin (HBIg) and nucleos(t)ide analogue (NUC) prophylaxis. MATERIAL AND METHODS Data from 371 adults transplanted for HBV-related disease at 20 European centers and given HBIg for ³12 months ± NUC therapy were analyzed retrospectively. RESULTS HBIg comprised Hepatect® (iv HBIgB; n=299), subcutaneous Zutectra® (sc HBIg, n=236), and other HBIg preparations (n=130); 93.5% received NUC therapy. Mean follow-up was 6.8±3.5 years. The primary efficacy variable, freedom from HBV recurrence, occurred in 95.7% of patients (95% CI [93.1%, 97.5%]). The observed incidence of recurrence was 16/371 (4.3%) (annual rate 0.65%); 5/16 patients with recurrence had discontinued HBIg and 7/16 had anti-HBs <100 IU/l. Excluding these 7 patients, the HBV recurrence rate was 2.4%. The recurrence rate while on HBIg therapy was 1 per 2069 months. In patients who discontinued HBIg, risk of HBV recurrence versus sc HBIg users was increased by 5.2-fold (1 per 1 603 versus 1 per 8379 treatment months). The annual rate of HBV-related hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) recurrence was 1.7%. CONCLUSIONS These results support the long-term use of HBIg with NUC therapy as an effective management strategy to minimize risk of HBV recurrence and virus-related complications after liver transplantation.
Keywords
Adolescent, Adult, Aged, Aged, 80 and over, Antiviral Agents/therapeutic use, Drug Therapy, Combination, Female, Follow-Up Studies, Hepatitis B, Chronic/prevention & control, Hepatitis B, Chronic/surgery, Humans, Immunoglobulins/therapeutic use, Liver Transplantation, Male, Middle Aged, Nucleosides/therapeutic use, Recurrence, Retrospective Studies, Secondary Prevention/methods, Treatment Outcome, Young Adult
Pubmed
Web of science
Create date
13/12/2018 14:09
Last modification date
20/08/2019 16:17
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