Turing's turtles all the way down: A conserved role of EDAR in the carapacial ridge suggests a deep homology of prepatterns across ectodermal appendages.

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Serval ID
serval:BIB_ADBB3F81DBEA
Type
Article: article from journal or magazin.
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Publications
Institution
Title
Turing's turtles all the way down: A conserved role of EDAR in the carapacial ridge suggests a deep homology of prepatterns across ectodermal appendages.
Journal
Anatomical record
Author(s)
Zimm R., Oberdick D., Gnetneva A., Schneider P., Cebra-Thomas J., Moustakas-Verho J.E.
ISSN
1932-8494 (Electronic)
ISSN-L
1932-8486
Publication state
In Press
Peer-reviewed
Oui
Language
english
Notes
Publication types: Journal Article
Publication Status: aheadofprint
Abstract
The scutes of the turtle shell are epidermal shields that begin their formation during the early stages of shell development. Like other skin appendages, turtle scutes are hypothesized to be patterned by reaction-diffusion systems. We have previously established ex vivo and in silico systems to study these mechanisms experimentally and have further shown that mathematical models can explain the dynamics of the induction of turtle scute primordia and the generation of final scute architecture. Using these foundations, we expand our current knowledge and test the roles of ectodysplasin and activin signaling in the development of turtle scutes. We find that these molecules play important roles in the prepatterning of scute primordia along the carapacial ridge and show that blocking Edar signaling may lead to a complete loss of marginal scute primordia. We show that it is possible to reproduce these observations using simple mathematical modeling, thereby suggesting a stabilizing role for ectodysplasin within the reaction-diffusion mechanisms. Finally, we argue that our findings further entrench turtle scutes within a class of developmental systems composed of hierarchically nested reaction-diffusion mechanisms, which is conserved across ectodermal organs.
Keywords
ectodermal appendage, evo devo, mathematical model, pattern formation, turtle shell
Pubmed
Web of science
Create date
25/10/2022 12:22
Last modification date
28/10/2022 6:13
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