Paralyzed neonatal larynx in adduction. Case series, systematic review and analysis.

Details

Serval ID
serval:BIB_ADBA79A4535F
Type
Article: article from journal or magazin.
Collection
Publications
Institution
Title
Paralyzed neonatal larynx in adduction. Case series, systematic review and analysis.
Journal
International Journal of Pediatric Otorhinolaryngology
Author(s)
Nisa L., Holtz F., Sandu K.
ISSN
1872-8464 (Electronic)
ISSN-L
0165-5876
Publication state
Published
Issued date
2013
Volume
77
Number
1
Pages
13-18
Language
english
Notes
Publication types: Journal ArticlePublication Status: ppublish. PDF type: Review article
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: Bilateral vocal cord abductor paralysis (BVCAbP) is considered a rare cause of stridor in the newborn. The goal of this work is to present a case series and to review systematically the literature on bilateral vocal cord abductor paralysis in the newborn to better characterize the current knowledge on this entity.
METHODS: We performed a systematic literature review with Medline (1950-2011). The authors screened all cases of BVCAbP reported and selected those affecting newborns.
RESULTS: Out of the 129 articles screened, 16 were included. A total of 69 cases could be retrieved and analyzed. Associated co-morbidities were found in 54% of the patients, most notably malformative conditions (intracranial or other), or a positive perinatal history (trauma/asphyxia, prematurity). Tracheostomy placement was required in 59% of children, and of these 44% were successfully decannulated. In terms of functional outcome full recovery or improvement were seen in 61% of patients. Major underlying co-morbidities affected negatively the functional outcome (p=.004), but not the need for tracheostomy (p=.604) or the decannulation success rate (p=.063).
CONCLUSION: BVCAbP in the newborn is a serious cause of airway obstruction. It can be seen either in a context of multisystem anomalies or as an isolated finding. Newborns with major co-morbidities affecting their normal development are more likely to have poor functional outcomes and to remain tracheostomy-dependant.
Pubmed
Web of science
Create date
07/03/2013 19:30
Last modification date
20/08/2019 16:17
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