Binge-watching in times of COVID-19: A longitudinal examination of changes in affect and TV series consumption patterns during lockdown.

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Version: Final published version
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Serval ID
serval:BIB_AC8D4EC6A1A9
Type
Article: article from journal or magazin.
Collection
Publications
Institution
Title
Binge-watching in times of COVID-19: A longitudinal examination of changes in affect and TV series consumption patterns during lockdown.
Journal
Psychology of Popular Media
Author(s)
Sigre-Leirós Vera, Billieux Joël, Mohr Christine, Maurage Pierre, King Daniel L., Schimmenti Adriano, Flayelle Maèva
ISSN
2689-6575
2689-6567
Publication state
In Press
Peer-reviewed
Oui
Language
english
Abstract
COVID-19 pandemic lockdowns have had major negative effects on individuals’ mental health and psychological well-being. Isolated at home, people may engage in recreational activities such as binge-watching (i.e., viewing multiple episodes of a TV series in 1 session) as a strategy to regulate emotional states. This is the first longitudinal study assessing changes in TV series viewing patterns during the first COVID-19 lockdown and examining whether binge-watching was associated with changes in positive and negative affect throughout this period. TV series viewing practices and motivations, binge-watching behaviors, psychopathological symptoms, and affective states were jointly assessed through a 6-week longitudinal online survey at 3 time points (i.e., T1, T2, and T3), in Belgium, France, and Switzerland. Results showed significant increases in individuals’ watching habits (e.g., higher daily time spent viewing, expansion of coviewing practices). Results from the longitudinal analyses principally showed that male gender and social motives for TV series watching predicted a decrease in negative affect levels. A problematic binge-watching pattern characterized by loss of control was the single predictor of an increase in negative affect over time. These findings suggest that TV series watching patterns effectively increased during the first COVID-19 lockdown. Watching TV series for social motives emerged as a protective factor, whereas problematic binge-watching seemed to act as a maladaptive emotion regulation strategy throughout these unprecedented circumstances.
Keywords
Psychology (miscellaneous), Applied Psychology, Communication, Cultural Studies
Open Access
Yes
Create date
27/02/2022 10:32
Last modification date
28/02/2022 8:11
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