Why Women Rarely Rise to the Top: A Social Identity Model of Leader Prototypes.

Details

Serval ID
serval:BIB_AACE61A42C51
Type
Inproceedings: an article in a conference proceedings.
Publication sub-type
Abstract (Abstract): shot summary in a article that contain essentials elements presented during a scientific conference, lecture or from a poster.
Collection
Publications
Title
Why Women Rarely Rise to the Top: A Social Identity Model of Leader Prototypes.
Title of the conference
16th European Association of Work and Organizational Psychology
Author(s)
Kleinlogel E. P., Dennerlein T., Dietz J., Gabarrot F.
Address
Münster, Germany
Publication state
Published
Issued date
05/2013
Peer-reviewed
Oui
Language
english
Abstract
Purpose
We propose a social identity model of leader prototypes to address why the maleness of leader prototypes is more pronounced among men than among women (e.g., Schein, 2001). Specifically, we argue that individuals project their ingroup prototype (e.g., a male prototype) onto a valued other category (e.g., leaders) (e.g., Wenzel, Mummendey, Weber, & Waldzus, 2003) in order to maintain a positive ingroup (e.g., gender) identity. We hypothesized that both women and men engage in ingroup projection of their gender prototype on their leader prototype, and we expected this effect to be stronger for men than women. We also investigated intelligence as a moderator of ingroup projection.
Methodology
Participants (276 students, University of Lausanne) assessed to what extent attributes on a list of gender traits were characteristic of a successful leader. We computed relative ingroup similarity scores (e.g., Waldzus & Mummendey, 2004) representing the difference between how characteristic ingroup traits are for a successful leader, and how characteristic outgroup traits are for a successful leader.
Results
Results showed that men engaged in ingroup projection while women engaged in outgroup projection, and that men engaged in ingroup projection to a greater extent. We also found a small, but positive effect of intelligence on ingroup projection among men.
Limitations
The use of a student sample might limit the external validity of our findings.
Implications
Our findings contribute to research on the under-representation of women in managerial roles, and introduce intelligence as a predictor of ingroup projection.
Value
Our study allows for a more fine-grained understanding of the cognitive representations of leaders of men and women.
Create date
15/04/2013 11:16
Last modification date
20/08/2019 16:14
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