Archaeorhizomycetes Spatial Distribution in Soils Along Wide Elevational and Environmental Gradients Reveal Co-abundance Patterns With Other Fungal Saprobes and Potential Weathering Capacities.

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State: Serval
Version: Final published version
License: CC BY 4.0
Serval ID
serval:BIB_AA333B1F4320
Type
Article: article from journal or magazin.
Collection
Publications
Title
Archaeorhizomycetes Spatial Distribution in Soils Along Wide Elevational and Environmental Gradients Reveal Co-abundance Patterns With Other Fungal Saprobes and Potential Weathering Capacities.
Journal
Frontiers in microbiology
Author(s)
Pinto-Figueroa E.A., Seddon E., Yashiro E., Buri A., Niculita-Hirzel H., van der Meer J.R., Guisan A.
ISSN
1664-302X (Print)
ISSN-L
1664-302X
Publication state
Published
Issued date
2019
Peer-reviewed
Oui
Volume
10
Pages
656
Language
english
Notes
Publication types: Journal Article
Publication Status: epublish
Abstract
Archaeorhizomycetes, a widespread fungal class with a dominant presence in many soil environments, contains cryptic filamentous species forming plant-root associations whose role in terrestrial ecosystems remains unclear. Here, we apply a correlative approach to identify the abiotic and biotic environmental variables shaping the distribution of this fungal group. We used a DNA sequencing dataset containing Archaeorhizomycetes sequences and environmental variables from 103 sites, obtained through a random-stratified sampling in the Western Swiss Alps along a wide elevation gradient (>2,500 m). We observed that the relative abundance of Archaeorhizomycetes follows a "humped-shaped" curve. Fitted linear and quadratic generalized linear models revealed that both climatic (minimum temperature, precipitation sum, growing degree-days) and edaphic (carbon, hydrogen, organic carbon, aluminum oxide, and phyllosilicates) factors contribute to explaining the variation in Archaeorhizomycetes abundance. Furthermore, a network inference topology described significant co-abundance patterns between Archaeorhizomycetes and other saprotrophic and ectomycorrhizal fungal taxa. Overall, our results provide strong support to the hypothesis that Archaeorhizomycetes in this area have clear ecological requirements along wide, elevation-driven abiotic and biotic gradients. Additionally, correlations to soil redox parameters, particularly with phyllosilicates minerals, suggest Archaeorhizomycetes might be implied in biological rock weathering. Such soil taxa-environment studies along wide gradients are thus a useful complement to latitudinal field observations and culture-based approaches to uncover the ecological roles of cryptic soil organisms.
Keywords
Altitudinal gradient, Archaeorhizomycetaceae, Archaeorhizomyces, fungi, HiSeq 2500, Illumina sequencing, abiotic and biotic requirements, correlation analyses, network analysis, phyllosilicates, Swiss Alps, Archaeorhizomyces, Illumina sequencing, Swiss Alps, abiotic and biotic requirements, correlation analyses, fungi, network analysis, phyllosilicates
Pubmed
Web of science
Open Access
Yes
Create date
15/03/2019 16:20
Last modification date
04/07/2019 16:44
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