The importance of host spatial distribution for parasite specialization and speciation: a comparative study of bird fleas (Siphonaptera : Ceratophyllidae)

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Serval ID
serval:BIB_A72030D82855
Type
Article: article from journal or magazin.
Collection
Publications
Institution
Title
The importance of host spatial distribution for parasite specialization and speciation: a comparative study of bird fleas (Siphonaptera : Ceratophyllidae)
Journal
Journal of Animal Ecology
Author(s)
Tripet F., Christe P., Møller A. P.
ISSN
0021-8790
Publication state
Published
Issued date
2002
Peer-reviewed
Oui
Volume
71
Number
5
Pages
735-748
Language
english
Abstract
1. The environment of parasites is determined largely by their hosts. Variation in host quality, abundance and spatial distribution affects the balance between selection within hosts and gene flow between hosts, and this should determine the evolution of a parasite's host-range and its propensity to locally adapt and speciate.
2. We investigated the relationship between host spatial distribution and (1) parasite host range, (2) parasite mobility and (3) parasite geographical range, in a comparative study of a major group of avian ectoparasites, the birds fleas belonging to the Ceratophyllidae (Siphonaptera).
3. Flea species parasitizing colonial birds had narrower host ranges than those infesting territorial nesters or birds with an intermediate level of nest aggregation.
4. The potential mobility and geographical ranges of fleas decreased with increasing level of aggregation of their hosts and increased with the fleas' host ranges.
5. Birds with aggregated nest distribution harboured more flea species mainly due to a larger number of specialists than solitarily nesting hosts.
6. These results emphasize the importance of host spatial distribution for the evolution of specialization, and for local adaptation and speciation in Ceratophyllid bird fleas.
Keywords
coloniality, geographical range, host range, local adaptation, radiation
Web of science
Create date
24/01/2008 19:14
Last modification date
20/08/2019 15:11
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