Working memory decline in normal aging: Is it really worse in space than in color?

Details

Serval ID
serval:BIB_A6D9BA073DAC
Type
Article: article from journal or magazin.
Collection
Publications
Institution
Title
Working memory decline in normal aging: Is it really worse in space than in color?
Journal
Learning and Motivation
Author(s)
Klencklen Giuliana, Banta Lavenex Pamela, Brandner Catherine, Lavenex Pierre
ISSN
0023-9690
Publication state
Published
Issued date
02/2017
Peer-reviewed
Oui
Volume
57
Pages
48-60
Language
english
Abstract
Aging is associated with a variety of changes in cognitive capacities, including a declinein working memory performance. Nevertheless, visuo-spatial working memory has beenshown to exhibit a greater age-related decline than verbal working memory. Here, weassessed age-related changes in allocentric spatial working memory and color workingmemory. We tested 20–30-year-old and 65–75-year-old adults on four memory tasksrequiring participants to learn, on a repeated-trial basis (i.e., reference memory) or a trial-unique basis (i.e., working memory), the locations or colors of three pads among 18 padsdistributed in a real-world laboratory environment. Older adults performed worse thanyoung adults on all memory tasks, but especially on working memory tasks. Some mea-sures, including the older adults’ relative decrease in the number of correct choices beforeerring (CBE), as compared to young adults, and the number of trials with the first or first twochoices correct, may suggest a greater age-related decline in allocentric spatial than colorworking memory. In contrast, the total number of disks visited to find the goals, the abso-lute decrease in CBE in older adults, the number of errorless trials and the number of trialswith the first three choices correct revealed no age-related differences in working memoryperformance for spatial versus color information. We discuss how, depending on the mea-sures used to evaluate memory performance, age-related declines in working memory mayappear greater for spatial information because allocentric spatial memory may have quan-titatively greater representational demands (i.e., require more bits of information) thancolor memory.
Keywords
Experimental and Cognitive Psychology, Education, Developmental and Educational Psychology, Health(social science), Neuropsychology and Physiological Psychology
Create date
15/02/2017 18:56
Last modification date
20/08/2019 15:11
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