Social integration and substance use: assessing the effects of an early intervention programme for youth.

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Version: Author's accepted manuscript
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Serval ID
serval:BIB_A64471F4A65B
Type
Article: article from journal or magazin.
Collection
Publications
Institution
Title
Social integration and substance use: assessing the effects of an early intervention programme for youth.
Journal
Early intervention in psychiatry
Author(s)
Brand A., Guillod L., Habersaat S., Panchaud E., Stéphan P., Urben S.
ISSN
1751-7893 (Electronic)
ISSN-L
1751-7885
Publication state
Published
Issued date
06/2018
Peer-reviewed
Oui
Volume
12
Number
3
Pages
426-432
Language
english
Notes
Publication types: Journal Article ; Observational Study
Publication Status: ppublish
Abstract
Appropriate social integration has been shown to be a protective factor against substance use among adolescents and associated negative consequences. Promoting social integration through early intervention with adolescents using substances is thus necessary and is the aim of the Identification, Assessment and Follow-up of Adolescents with Substance Use (in French, Dépistage - évaluation - parrainage d'adolescents consommateurs de substances (DEPART) programme. The present study aimed to describe this programme and its participants from 2009 to 2013 as well as to assess its effects on social integration.
Data from 398 adolescents using substances who attended the DEPART programme were analysed.
The results showed that almost 80% of the adolescents admitted to the DEPART programme were boys, with a large proportion using cannabis. Globally, social integration did not increase from admission to discharge from the programme, but a shift was observed for school and professional integration. Additionally, after the intervention, we observed that social integration was more important in younger patients.
This study showed that adolescents with problematic substance use mostly consumed soft drugs and that those who were integrated into the DEPART programme at a younger age were more likely to be socially integrated at the end of the programme.
Keywords
Adolescent, Child, Drug Users/psychology, Female, Humans, Male, Program Development/statistics & numerical data, Retrospective Studies, Schools, Social Behavior, Young Adult, early intervention, social disruption, social integration, substance use
Pubmed
Web of science
Create date
20/02/2016 17:03
Last modification date
22/08/2019 9:26
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