Met-enkephalin, beta-endorphin and cortisol responses to sub-maximal exercise after sleep disturbances.

Details

Serval ID
serval:BIB_A5BF21144C89
Type
Article: article from journal or magazin.
Collection
Publications
Institution
Title
Met-enkephalin, beta-endorphin and cortisol responses to sub-maximal exercise after sleep disturbances.
Journal
European Journal of Applied Physiology and Occupational Physiology
Author(s)
Mougin F., Simon-Rigaud M.L., Mougin C., Bourdin H., Jacquier M.C., Henriet M.T., Davenne D., Kantelip J.P., Magnin P., Gaillard R.C.
ISSN
0301-5548
Publication state
Published
Issued date
1992
Peer-reviewed
Oui
Volume
64
Number
4
Pages
371-376
Language
english
Notes
Publication types: Journal Article
Abstract
The present study compared the effects of partial sleep deprivation and the effects of an intake of a hypnotic compound (zolpidem) prior to bedtime, on sleep and on hormonal and metabolic adaptations to subsequent exercise. Sleep deprivation consisted of a delayed bedtime and an early getting-up time. Eight young subjects, who slept well and were highly trained athletes, were enrolled in this study. Sleep was recorded polygraphically and the following afternoon exercise was performed on a cycle ergometer for 30 min at 75% of maximal oxygen consumption (VO2max) after a 10-min warm up. Met-enkephalin, beta-endorphin, cortisol, and lactate concentrations were measured at rest and during exercise. The data obtained after experimental sleep, with and without medication were compared with those obtained in the reference condition with normal sleep. Both types of sleep reduction decreased the total sleep time, stage 2 sleep, and rapid eye movement sleep, whereas zolpidem administration did not modify either the duration of sleep or the sleep stages. After the reference night, plasma met-enkephalin did not show any significant change at the end of the submaximal exercise, whereas beta-endorphin, cortisol, and lactic acid concentrations increased significantly in all subjects. The changes in concentration in beta-endorphin were significantly related to the changes in cortisol (r = 0.78; P less than 0.01) and to the changes in plasma lactic acid (r = 0.58; P less than 0.05). Cortisol concentrations were also related to lactic acid values (r = 0.94; P less than 0.01).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)
Keywords
Adult, Enkephalin, Methionine/blood, Exercise/physiology, Humans, Hydrocortisone/blood, Lactates/blood, Lactic Acid, Pyridines/pharmacology, Sleep/drug effects, Sleep/physiology, Sleep Deprivation/physiology, beta-Endorphin/blood
Pubmed
Web of science
Create date
15/02/2008 16:57
Last modification date
20/08/2019 15:10
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