To see or not to see: Importance of color perception to color therapy

Details

Ressource 1Request a copy Sous embargo jusqu'au 22/02/2021.
State: Public
Version: Author's accepted manuscript
License: CC BY-NC-ND 4.0
Secondary document(s)
Sous embargo jusqu'au 22/02/2021.
State: Public
Version: Author's accepted manuscript
License: Not specified
Serval ID
serval:BIB_A3C7052C22D4
Type
Article: article from journal or magazin.
Collection
Publications
Institution
Title
To see or not to see: Importance of color perception to color therapy
Journal
Color Research & Application
Author(s)
Jonauskaite Domicele, Tremea Irina, Bürki Loyse, Diouf Cécile N., Mohr Christine
ISSN
0361-2317
1520-6378
Publication state
Published
Issued date
07/04/2020
Peer-reviewed
Oui
Volume
45
Number
3
Pages
450-464
Language
english
Abstract
Color therapy, healing through color, supposedly works through the physical exposure to color. In two studies, we assessed stress and anxiety reduction after color exposure using a commercially available relaxation‐through‐color routine. Participants either completed the routine by looking at the accompanying color disks or at a white patch. In study 1 (longitudinal), 60 participants completed the routine three times, each testing session separated by a week. In study 2 (cross‐sectional), 63 participants completed half of the trials once. In both studies, we recorded a decrease in stress and anxiety levels comparing before‐after scores. In study 1, we recorded incremental decreases with each week. Crucially, decreases were the same whether participants (a) physically saw colors or not, and (b) completed the full or shortened version. We conclude that other factors but physical exposure to color explain changes in affective states associated with this and probably other color therapy routines.
Keywords
body-mind, chromotherapy, color interventions, color psychology, health, meditation
Funding(s)
Swiss National Science Foundation / Projects / 100014_182138
Swiss National Science Foundation / Careers / P0LAP1_175055
Create date
23/02/2020 15:20
Last modification date
22/05/2020 6:21
Usage data