Rotator cuff strength in recurrent anterior shoulder instability.

Details

Serval ID
serval:BIB_A3B97911A8E8
Type
Article: article from journal or magazin.
Collection
Publications
Title
Rotator cuff strength in recurrent anterior shoulder instability.
Journal
Journal of Bone and Joint Surgery. American Volume
Author(s)
Edouard P., Degache F., Beguin L., Samozino P., Gresta G., Fayolle-Minon I., Farizon F., Calmels P.
ISSN
0021-9355
ISSN-L
1535-1386 (Electronic)
Publication state
Published
Issued date
2011
Peer-reviewed
Oui
Volume
93
Number
8
Pages
759-765
Language
english
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Although rotator-cuff muscle contraction plays an important role in stabilizing the glenohumeral joint, little is known about the role of these muscles in the pathophysiology of recurrent anterior instability. We intended to analyze the association between isokinetic internal rotator and external rotator muscle strength and glenohumeral joint instability in patients with recurrent anterior instability that was not previously treated surgically.
METHODS: We enrolled thirty-seven patients with unilateral recurrent anterior posttraumatic shoulder dislocation and eleven healthy nonathletic subjects in this controlled study. The association between internal rotator and external rotator strength and shoulder instability was analyzed by side-to-side comparisons and comparisons with a control group. Isokinetic internal rotator and external rotator strength was evaluated with a Con-Trex dynamometer, with the subject seated and the shoulder abducted 45° in the scapular plane. Tests were performed at 180°/s, 120°/s, and 60°/s in concentric mode for both sides. Peak torque normalized to body weight and external rotator to internal rotator ratio were calculated for each angular velocity. Clinical and isokinetic evaluation was done by the same rehabilitation physician.
RESULTS: The association between shoulder instability and internal rotator and external rotator strength was associated with side-to-side differences (p < 0.05). Compared with a control group, strength values were lower on the pathological shoulder side of the patients with shoulder instability than on the healthy contralateral shoulder of control subjects at 180°/s and 120°/s (p < 0.05). The side-to-side differences were increased when the nondominant upper-extremity side was involved and were decreased when the dominant side was involved. There was no association between glenohumeral joint instability and external rotator to internal rotator ratio.
CONCLUSIONS: Internal rotator and external rotator weakness was associated with recurrent anterior instability, and side-to-side differences depended on the side of hand dominance. Use of a control group may help in the analysis of the influence of constraints on shoulder strength. Further prospective studies are necessary to determine whether the weakness is a cause or an effect of the instability.
Keywords
Adolescent, Adult, Analysis of Variance, Case-Control Studies, Female, Humans, Joint Instability/physiopathology, Male, Middle Aged, Muscle Contraction/physiology, Range of Motion, Articular/physiology, Rotator Cuff/physiopathology, Scapula/physiopathology, Shoulder Dislocation/physiopathology, Shoulder Joint/physiopathology
Pubmed
Web of science
Create date
19/10/2010 16:11
Last modification date
20/08/2019 15:09
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