Difficulties in disengaging attentional resources from self-generated thoughts moderate the link between dysphoria and maladaptive self-referential thinking

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State: Public
Version: Final published version
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Serval ID
serval:BIB_A3A7466432D3
Type
Article: article from journal or magazin.
Collection
Publications
Title
Difficulties in disengaging attentional resources from self-generated thoughts moderate the link between dysphoria and maladaptive self-referential thinking
Journal
Cognition & Emotion
Author(s)
Rochat Lucien, Billieux Joël, Van der Linden Martial
ISSN
0269-9931
1464-0600
Publication state
Published
Issued date
2012
Peer-reviewed
Oui
Volume
26
Number
4
Pages
748-757
Language
english
Abstract
Negative emotions increase self-focused attention, a core feature of depression and anxiety-related
disorders. However, the cognitive mechanisms associated with the tendency to self-focus*and,
conversely, with the ability to voluntarily disengage attentional resources from the self and direct
them towards the external environment*remain poorly understood. Thus, this study aimed to
examine whether a specific cognitive control mechanism that directs attention between self-generated
thoughts and external information might moderate the relationship between dysphoria and
maladaptive self-referential thinking. Results showed that dysphoria increases the frequency of
rumination, self-blame, and catastrophising, especially for participants who have more difficulty in
switching from self-generated thoughts to information provided by the environment. These results
shed new light on the cognitive mechanisms underlying maladaptive self-referential thinking
associated with dysphoria. More specifically, this specific cognitive mechanism might play a key role
in the maintenance or amplification of a depressed mood
Keywords
Cognitive control, Shifting, Dysphoria, Self-referential thinking, Rumination.
Pubmed
Web of science
Create date
10/01/2020 10:31
Last modification date
23/01/2020 10:41
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