Circulation research online only : october 29, 1999UltraRapid CommunicationsA mouse model of arterial gene TransferAntigen-specific immunity is a minor determinant of the early loss of adenovirus-mediated transgene expression

Details

Serval ID
serval:BIB_A35B90E37722
Type
Article: article from journal or magazin.
Collection
Publications
Institution
Title
Circulation research online only : october 29, 1999UltraRapid CommunicationsA mouse model of arterial gene TransferAntigen-specific immunity is a minor determinant of the early loss of adenovirus-mediated transgene expression
Journal
Circulation Research
Author(s)
Vassalli  G., Agah  R., Qiao  R., Aguilar  C., Dichek  D. A.
ISSN
1524-4571 (Electronic)
Publication state
Published
Issued date
10/1999
Volume
85
Number
9
Pages
875
Notes
Journal article --- Old month value: Oct 29
Abstract
We developed a murine model of arterial gene transfer and used it to test the role of antigen-specific immunity in the loss of adenovirus-mediated transgene expression. Adenoviral vectors encoding either beta-galactosidase (beta-gal) or green fluorescent protein were infused to the lumen of normal common carotids of CD-1 and C57BL/6 mice and atherosclerotic carotids of Apoe(-/-) mice. At 3 days after gene transfer, significant reporter gene expression was detected in all strains. Transgene expression was transient, with expression undetectable at 14 days. Next, a beta-gal-expressing vector was infused into carotids of ROSA26 mice (transgenic for, and therefore tolerant of, beta-gal) and RAG-2(-/-) mice (deficient in recombinase-activating gene [RAG]-2 and therefore lacking in antigen-specific immunity). beta-Gal expression was again high at 3 days but declined substantially (>90%) by 14 days. In vivo labeling with bromodeoxyuridine revealed that carotid endothelial proliferation was increased dramatically by the gene-transfer procedure alone, likely leading to the loss of episomal adenoviral DNA. Gene transfer to normal and atherosclerotic mouse carotids can be accomplished; however, elimination of antigen-specific immune responses does not prevent the early loss of adenovirus-mediated transgene expression. Efforts to prolong adenovirus-mediated transgene expression in the artery wall must be redirected. These efforts will likely include strategies to avoid the consequences of increased cell turnover. Nevertheless, despite the brevity of expression, this mouse model of gene transfer to normal and severely atherosclerotic arteries will likely be useful for investigating the genetic basis of vascular disease and for developing gene therapies. The full text of this article is available at http://www.circresaha. org.
Pubmed
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28/01/2008 10:32
Last modification date
20/08/2019 15:09
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