Locally Adaptive Inversions Modulate Genetic Variation at Different Geographic Scales in a Seaweed Fly.

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Serval ID
serval:BIB_A14DA05CB4F4
Type
Article: article from journal or magazin.
Collection
Publications
Institution
Title
Locally Adaptive Inversions Modulate Genetic Variation at Different Geographic Scales in a Seaweed Fly.
Journal
Molecular biology and evolution
Author(s)
Mérot C., Berdan E.L., Cayuela H., Djambazian H., Ferchaud A.L., Laporte M., Normandeau E., Ragoussis J., Wellenreuther M., Bernatchez L.
ISSN
1537-1719 (Electronic)
ISSN-L
0737-4038
Publication state
Published
Issued date
23/08/2021
Peer-reviewed
Oui
Volume
38
Number
9
Pages
3953-3971
Language
english
Notes
Publication types: Journal Article
Publication Status: ppublish
Abstract
Across a species range, multiple sources of environmental heterogeneity, at both small and large scales, create complex landscapes of selection, which may challenge adaptation, particularly when gene flow is high. One key to multidimensional adaptation may reside in the heterogeneity of recombination along the genome. Structural variants, like chromosomal inversions, reduce recombination, increasing linkage disequilibrium among loci at a potentially massive scale. In this study, we examined how chromosomal inversions shape genetic variation across a species range and ask how their contribution to adaptation in the face of gene flow varies across geographic scales. We sampled the seaweed fly Coelopa frigida along a bioclimatic gradient stretching across 10° of latitude, a salinity gradient, and a range of heterogeneous, patchy habitats. We generated a chromosome-level genome assembly to analyze 1,446 low-coverage whole genomes collected along those gradients. We found several large nonrecombining genomic regions, including putative inversions. In contrast to the collinear regions, inversions and low-recombining regions differentiated populations more strongly, either along an ecogeographic cline or at a fine-grained scale. These genomic regions were associated with environmental factors and adaptive phenotypes, albeit with contrasting patterns. Altogether, our results highlight the importance of recombination in shaping adaptation to environmental heterogeneity at local and large scales.
Keywords
diptera, environmental associations, local adaptation, population genomics, structural variants
Pubmed
Web of science
Open Access
Yes
Create date
24/05/2021 12:57
Last modification date
21/11/2022 8:31
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