Changes in exercise characteristics, maximal voluntary contraction, and explosive strength during prolonged tennis playing

Details

Serval ID
serval:BIB_A10911141FC7
Type
Article: article from journal or magazin.
Collection
Publications
Title
Changes in exercise characteristics, maximal voluntary contraction, and explosive strength during prolonged tennis playing
Journal
British Journal of Sports Medicine
Author(s)
Girard O., Lattier G., Micallef J.P., Millet G.P.
ISSN
1473-0480[electronic]
Publication state
Published
Issued date
06/2006
Volume
40
Number
6
Pages
521-526
Language
english
Notes
Publication types: Journal Article Publication Status: ppublish
Abstract
OBJECTIVES: To examine changes in exercise characteristics, maximal voluntary contraction, and explosive strength during prolonged tennis playing. METHODS: Maximal isometric voluntary contraction (MVC), leg stiffness (hopping), and peak power in squat (SJ) and countermovement (CMJ) jumps were measured before, every 30 minutes during, and 30 minutes after a three hour tennis match in 12 well trained players. Heart rate (HR), the effective playing time (EPT), rating of perceived exertion (RPE), and muscle soreness of knee extensors were also measured. RESULTS: Decreases in MVC (-9%; p < 0.05) and leg stiffness (-9%; p = 0.17) were observed after the match and were significantly correlated (r = 0.66; p = 0.05). Peak power in SJ and CMJ tests was maintained during the match but was lower (p < 0.001) 30 minutes after. Average HR and EPT were 144 (8) beats/min and 21 (4)% respectively. A strong correlation was found between EPT and HR (r = 0.93; p < 0.05). RPE and muscle soreness increased linearly during the exercise and were significantly correlated (r = 0.99; p < 0.001). CONCLUSIONS: Progressive reductions in maximal voluntary strength and leg stiffness highly correlated with increases in perceived exertion and muscle soreness were observed throughout a three hour tennis match, whereas explosive strength was maintained and decreased only after the match. These alterations may result in less efficient on-court movement and stroke production. They are, however, lower than those reported during continuous exercise of the same duration. The intermittent pattern of tennis and the numerous stretch-shortening cycle movements partly explain these results.
Keywords
Adult, Analysis of Variance, Body Weight/physiology, Exercise/physiology, Heart Rate/physiology, Humans, Isometric Contraction/physiology, Male, Muscle Fatigue/physiology, Physical Endurance/physiology, Physical Exertion/physiology, Tennis/physiology
Pubmed
Web of science
Create date
25/09/2008 8:01
Last modification date
20/08/2019 15:07
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