Measuring Slowness in Old Age: Times to Perform Moberg Picking-Up and Walking Speed Tests.

Details

Ressource 1Download: 1-s2.0-S1525861020302796-main.pdf (1186.32 [Ko])
State: Public
Version: Final published version
License: CC BY-NC-ND 4.0
Serval ID
serval:BIB_A0E0F0B21192
Type
Article: article from journal or magazin.
Collection
Publications
Institution
Title
Measuring Slowness in Old Age: Times to Perform Moberg Picking-Up and Walking Speed Tests.
Journal
Journal of the American Medical Directors Association
Author(s)
Santos-Eggimann B., Ballan K., Fustinoni S., Büla C.
ISSN
1538-9375 (Electronic)
ISSN-L
1525-8610
Publication state
Published
Issued date
11/2020
Peer-reviewed
Oui
Volume
21
Number
11
Pages
1729-1734.e2
Language
english
Notes
Publication types: Journal Article
Publication Status: ppublish
Abstract
Slowness is a marker of frailty captured by the Fried phenotype by a walking speed test which, for health or logistical reasons, is sometimes difficult to perform. The Moberg picking-up test (MPUT) is another timed functional test. It measures hand motor activity and might represent an alternative to assess slowness when the walking speed cannot be evaluated. This study aimed to evaluate the relationship between MPUT and walking speed.
Cross-sectional.
In total, 2748 individuals aged 66 to 83 years who participated in the latest examination (2015-2017) of the population-based Lausanne cohort 65+ and completed both tests.
Walking speed (time to walk 20 meters at usual pace) and MPUT (time to pick up 12 objects) were compared using scatter graphs. Multivariate regression models further investigated the relationship between MPUT and walking times with adjustment for height, grip strength, body mass index, and Mini-Mental State Examination. All analyses were stratified by sex.
MPUT and walking times were moderately, positively correlated in men (r = 0.38, P < .001) and in women (r = 0.38, P < .001). Higher grip strength and Mini-Mental State Examination performances were correlated to shorter MPUT and walking times. Men and women slower at the MPUT were also significantly slower at the walking speed test when adjusting for height (P < .001) as well as in fully adjusted models (P < .001).
These preliminary results point to a positive association between MPUT and walking speed independent of muscle strength and cognition. Further research is needed to investigate the capacity of MPUT to predict adverse health outcomes before considering this test as an alternative measure of slowness in the assessment of frailty.
Keywords
Frailty, motor slowness, performance, timed tests
Pubmed
Web of science
Open Access
Yes
Create date
28/05/2020 10:50
Last modification date
17/02/2021 8:10
Usage data