Identification of pyridine analogs as new predator-derived kairomones.

Details

Ressource 1Download: pmid26283896.pdf (4111.22 [Ko])
State: Serval
Version: Final published version
Serval ID
serval:BIB_A042538D6E21
Type
Article: article from journal or magazin.
Collection
Publications
Title
Identification of pyridine analogs as new predator-derived kairomones.
Journal
Frontiers In Neuroscience
Author(s)
Brechbühl J., Moine F., Tosato M.N., Sporkert F., Broillet M.C.
ISSN
1662-4548 (Print)
ISSN-L
1662-453X
Publication state
Published
Issued date
2015
Peer-reviewed
Oui
Volume
9
Pages
253
Language
english
Notes
Publication types: In OA
Abstract
In the wild, animals have developed survival strategies relying on their senses. The individual ability to identify threatening situations is crucial and leads to increase in the overall fitness of the species. Rodents, for example have developed in their nasal cavities specialized olfactory neurons implicated in the detection of volatile cues encoding for impending danger such as predator scents or alarm pheromones. In particular, the neurons of the Grueneberg ganglion (GG), an olfactory subsystem, are implicated in the detection of danger cues sharing a similar chemical signature, a heterocyclic sulfur- or nitrogen-containing motif. Here we used a "from the wild to the lab" approach to identify new molecules that are involuntarily emitted by predators and that initiate fear-related responses in the recipient animal, the putative prey. We collected urines from carnivores as sources of predator scents and first verified their impact on the blood pressure of the mice. With this approach, the urine of the mountain lion emerged as the most potent source of chemical stress. We then identified in this biological fluid, new volatile cues with characteristic GG-related fingerprints, in particular the methylated pyridine structures, 2,4-lutidine and its analogs. We finally verified their encoded danger quality and demonstrated their ability to mimic the effects of the predator urine on GG neurons, on mice blood pressure and in behavioral experiments. In summary, we were able to identify here, with the use of an integrative approach, new relevant molecules, the pyridine analogs, implicated in interspecies danger communication.
Pubmed
Web of science
Open Access
Yes
Create date
20/08/2015 16:09
Last modification date
08/05/2019 22:54
Usage data