Sex and Exercise Intensity Do Not Influence Oxygen Uptake Kinetics in Submaximal Swimming.

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Version: Final published version
Serval ID
serval:BIB_9F6A07D91075
Type
Article: article from journal or magazin.
Collection
Publications
Institution
Title
Sex and Exercise Intensity Do Not Influence Oxygen Uptake Kinetics in Submaximal Swimming.
Journal
Frontiers in physiology
Author(s)
Reis J.F., Millet G.P., Bruno P.M., Vleck V., Alves F.B.
ISSN-L
1664-042X
Publication state
Published
Issued date
2017
Peer-reviewed
Oui
Volume
8
Pages
72
Language
english
Abstract
The aim of this study was to compare the oxygen uptake ([Formula: see text]) kinetics in front crawl between male and female swimmers at moderate and heavy intensity. We hypothesized that the time constant for the primary phase [Formula: see text] kinetics was faster in men than in women, for both intensities. Nineteen well trained swimmers (8 females mean ± SD; age 17.9 ± 3.5 years; mass 55.2 ± 3.6 kg; height 1.66 ± 0.05 m and 11 male 21.9 ± 2.8 years; 78.2 ± 11.1 kg; 1.81 ± 0.08 m) performed a discontinuous maximal incremental test and two 600-m square wave transitions for both moderate and heavy intensities to determine the [Formula: see text] kinetics parameters using mono- and bi-exponential models, respectively. All the tests involved breath-by-breath analysis of front crawl swimming using a swimming snorkel. The maximal oxygen uptake [Formula: see text] was higher in men than in women [4,492 ± 585 ml·min(-1) and 57.7 ± 4.4 ml·kg(-1)·min(-1) vs. 2,752.4 ± 187.9 ml·min(-1) (p ≤ 0.001) and 50.0 ± 5.7 ml·kg(-1)·min(-1)(p = 0.007), respectively]. Similarly, the absolute amplitude of the primary component was higher in men for both intensities (moderate: 1,736 ± 164 vs. 1,121 ± 149 ml·min(-1); heavy: 2,948 ± 227 vs. 1,927 ± 243 ml·min(-1), p ≤ 0.001, for males and females, respectively). However, the time constant of the primary component (τp) was not influenced by sex (p = 0.527) or swimming intensity (p = 0.804) (moderate: 15.1 ± 5.6 vs. 14.4 ± 5.1 s; heavy: 13.5 ± 3.3 vs. 16.0 ± 4.5 s, for females and males, respectively). The slow component in the heavy domain was not significantly different between female and male swimmers (3.2 ± 2.4 vs. 3.8 ± 1.0 ml·kg(-1)·min(-1), p = 0.476). Overall, only the absolute amplitude of the primary component was higher in men, while the other [Formula: see text] kinetics parameters were similar between female and male swimmers at both moderate and heavy intensities. The mechanisms underlying these similarities remain unclear.

Pubmed
Web of science
Open Access
Yes
Create date
28/02/2017 10:21
Last modification date
20/08/2019 15:05
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