Doing the splits between parental duties and paid labour the "role" of multiple roles on alcohol use among women in Switzerland

Details

Serval ID
serval:BIB_9E339BB82767
Type
Inproceedings: an article in a conference proceedings.
Publication sub-type
Abstract (Abstract): shot summary in a article that contain essentials elements presented during a scientific conference, lecture or from a poster.
Collection
Publications
Institution
Title
Doing the splits between parental duties and paid labour the "role" of multiple roles on alcohol use among women in Switzerland
Title of the conference
34th Annual Alcohol Epidemiology Symposium of the Kettil Bruun Society
Author(s)
Kuntsche S., Knibbe R., Gmel G.
Address
Victoria, Canada, June 2-6, 2008
Publication state
Published
Issued date
2008
Language
english
Notes
The relevance of social roles varies depending on the particular characteristics of each role and the interrelations between these roles. The present study attempts to analyse the relation between parenthood and the employment background and their influence on alcohol use among women living in Switzerland. In addition, possible differences related to the family
as well as job characteristics will be taken into account. METHOD: Analysis is based on a national representative sample of 25 to 45 years old mothers in Switzerland. Logistic regressions of heavy volume drinking on the interaction of age of the youngest child and level of paid employment were adjusted for possible confounding family and job characteristics. RESULTS: The impact of age of the youngest child on heavy volume drinking varied across different levels of employment, but neither the family nor the job characteristics
could explain these differences. CONCLUSION: Depending of the level of employment the age of the youngest child reduced or increased the risk for heavy volume drinking indicating a differential vulnerability of housewives, part-time, or full-time working mothers.
Create date
27/03/2009 11:59
Last modification date
20/08/2019 15:04
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