Acute and long-lasting effects of oxytocin in cortico-limbic circuits: consequences for fear recall and extinction.

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Version: Author's accepted manuscript
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Serval ID
serval:BIB_9DADCF4644BA
Type
Article: article from journal or magazin.
Publication sub-type
Review (review): journal as complete as possible of one specific subject, written based on exhaustive analyses from published work.
Collection
Publications
Title
Acute and long-lasting effects of oxytocin in cortico-limbic circuits: consequences for fear recall and extinction.
Journal
Psychopharmacology
Author(s)
Triana-Del Río R., van den Burg E., Stoop R., Hegoburu C.
ISSN
1432-2072 (Electronic)
ISSN-L
0033-3158
Publication state
Published
Issued date
01/2019
Peer-reviewed
Oui
Volume
236
Number
1
Pages
339-354
Language
english
Notes
Publication types: Journal Article ; Review
Publication Status: ppublish
Abstract
The extinction of conditioned fear responses entrains the formation of safe new memories to decrease those behavioral responses. The knowledge in neuronal mechanisms of extinction is fundamental in the treatment of anxiety and fear disorders. Interestingly, the use of pharmacological compounds that reduce anxiety and fear has been shown as a potent co-adjuvant in extinction therapy. However, the efficiency and mechanisms by which pharmacological compounds promote extinction of fear memories remains still largely unknown and would benefit from a validation based on functional neuronal circuits, and the neurotransmitters that modulate them. From this perspective, oxytocin receptor signaling, which has been shown in cortical and limbic areas to modulate numerous functions (Eliava et al. Neuron 89(6):1291-1304, 2016), among them fear and anxiety circuits, and to enhance the salience of social stimuli (Stoop Neuron 76(1):142-59, 2012), may offer an interesting perspective. Experiments in animals and humans suggest that oxytocin could be a promising pharmacological agent at adjusting memory consolidation to boost fear extinction. Additionally, it is possible that long-term changes in endogenous oxytocin signaling can also play a role in reducing expression of fear at different brain targets. In this review, we summarize the effects reported for oxytocin in cortico-limbic circuits and on fear behavior that are of relevance for the modulation and potential extinction of fear memories.
Keywords
Animals, Anxiety Disorders/physiopathology, Central Amygdaloid Nucleus/drug effects, Central Amygdaloid Nucleus/physiopathology, Conditioning, Classical/drug effects, Conditioning, Classical/physiology, Extinction, Psychological/drug effects, Extinction, Psychological/physiology, Fear/drug effects, Fear/physiology, Humans, Limbic System/drug effects, Limbic System/physiopathology, Mental Recall/drug effects, Mental Recall/physiology, Nerve Net/drug effects, Nerve Net/physiopathology, Neurons/drug effects, Neurons/physiology, Oxytocin/pharmacology, Prefrontal Cortex/drug effects, Prefrontal Cortex/physiopathology, Retention (Psychology)/drug effects, Retention (Psychology)/physiology, Central amygdala, Fear extinction, Fear retrieval, Oxytocin, Prefrontal cortex
Pubmed
Web of science
Create date
17/10/2018 9:36
Last modification date
20/08/2019 16:04
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