Distinct roles of NMDA receptors at different stages of granule cell development in the adult brain.

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State: Public
Version: Final published version
Serval ID
serval:BIB_9D52A3150979
Type
Article: article from journal or magazin.
Collection
Publications
Institution
Title
Distinct roles of NMDA receptors at different stages of granule cell development in the adult brain.
Journal
Elife
Author(s)
Mu Y., Zhao C., Toni N., Yao J., Gage F.H.
ISSN
2050-084X (Electronic)
ISSN-L
2050-084X
Publication state
Published
Issued date
2015
Peer-reviewed
Oui
Volume
4
Pages
e07871
Language
english
Notes
Publication types: Journal Article ; Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural ; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Publication Status: epublish
Abstract
NMDA receptor (NMDAR)-dependent forms of synaptic plasticity are thought to underlie the assembly of developing neuronal circuits and to play a crucial role in learning and memory. It remains unclear how NMDAR might contribute to the wiring of adult-born granule cells (GCs). Here we demonstrate that nascent GCs lacking NMDARs but rescued from apoptosis by overexpressing the pro-survival protein Bcl2 were deficient in spine formation. Insufficient spinogenesis might be a general cause of cell death restricted within the NMDAR-dependent critical time window for GC survival. NMDAR loss also led to enhanced mushroom spine formation and synaptic AMPAR activity throughout the development of newborn GCs. Moreover, similar elevated synapse maturation in the absence of NMDARs was observed in neonate-generated GCs and CA1 pyramidal neurons. Together, these data suggest that NMDAR operates as a molecular monitor for controlling the activity-dependent establishment and maturation rate of synaptic connections between newborn neurons and others.
Keywords
Animals, Brain/cytology, Cell Differentiation, Mice, Knockout, Neurons/physiology, Receptors, N-Methyl-D-Aspartate/metabolism
Pubmed
Web of science
Open Access
Yes
Create date
24/12/2015 11:42
Last modification date
20/08/2019 15:03
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