A multicentre study of the trend of adverse events during outpatient anaesthesia in Switzerland during 2000-2016.

Details

Serval ID
serval:BIB_9CB85187D6C5
Type
Article: article from journal or magazin.
Collection
Publications
Institution
Title
A multicentre study of the trend of adverse events during outpatient anaesthesia in Switzerland during 2000-2016.
Journal
Swiss medical weekly
Author(s)
Laaboub N., Savidan A., Pittet V., Faouzi M., Burnand B., Taffé P.
ISSN
1424-3997 (Electronic)
ISSN-L
0036-7672
Publication state
Published
Issued date
19/10/2020
Peer-reviewed
Oui
Volume
150
Pages
w20365
Language
english
Notes
Publication types: Journal Article
Publication Status: epublish
Abstract
Over the last three decades, the use of outpatient surgery has been steadily increasing. Simultaneously, there has been an inciting movement to measure and improve healthcare quality and safety. Nevertheless, anaesthesia-related morbidity remains significant. We aimed to evaluate the incidence of intraoperative adverse events (IAEs) occurring during outpatient surgery.
We used data from the Anaesthesia Databank Switzerland (ADS), a voluntary register. We assessed the overall and specific incidence of IAEs, according to a predefined list of technical, cardiovascular, organisational, respiratory, and general incidents in Switzerland between 2000 and 2016. Primary and secondary outcomes were modelled using multi-level logistic regression analysis, and the time trend on the probabilities of events was assessed.
Between 2000 and 2016, 289,948 outpatient anaesthesia procedures were performed. During this period, the estimated probability of overall intraoperative adverse events decreased from 10.8% to 6.3%, and from 2.3% to 1.4% for technical incidents, from 3.0% to 2.2% for cardiovascular, from 1.6% to 1.3% for organisational, from 0.9% to 0.7% for general, and from 1.1% to 0.7% for respiratory incidents.
The occurrence of intraoperative adverse events in ambulatory anaesthesia has continuously decreased between 2000 and 2016. This trend is essentially attributable to a reduction in the incidence of technical, cardiovascular and organisational events. &nbsp.
Pubmed
Open Access
Yes
Create date
23/11/2020 15:17
Last modification date
01/12/2020 6:26
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