Remodelling the attentional system after left hemispheric stroke: Effect of leftward prismatic adaptation.

Details

Serval ID
serval:BIB_9C6DA609C1ED
Type
Article: article from journal or magazin.
Collection
Publications
Institution
Title
Remodelling the attentional system after left hemispheric stroke: Effect of leftward prismatic adaptation.
Journal
Cortex; a journal devoted to the study of the nervous system and behavior
Author(s)
Crottaz-Herbette S., Tissieres I., Fornari E., Rapin P.A., Clarke S.
ISSN
1973-8102 (Electronic)
ISSN-L
0010-9452
Publication state
Published
Issued date
06/2019
Peer-reviewed
Oui
Volume
115
Pages
43-55
Language
english
Notes
Publication types: Journal Article
Publication Status: ppublish
Abstract
Left hemispheric stroke is known to be associated with right neglect and/or not lateralized attentional deficits. The former appears to respond favourably to leftward prismatic adaptation (L-PA), as reported in a case of a large left stroke. In normal subjects, brief exposure to L-PA was shown to enhance the representation of the right visual field within the right inferior parietal lobule, emphasizing thus right hemispheric dominance within the ventral attentional system. We have investigated whether L-PA does the same in left hemispheric stroke by comparing neural responses to left, central and right stimuli before and after a brief exposure to L-PA. Neural responses to visual stimuli were significantly modulated within a large part of the occipito-temporal cortex and in smaller clusters in the angular gyrus, the anterior temporal lobe and the insula, corresponding to decrease in activity. Within the occipito-temporal region the decrease concerned predominantly neural activity elicited by left stimuli, downregulating thus the representation of the contralateral visual field, which is characteristic of the higher-order visual areas in this region.
Keywords
Functional MRI, Postlesional plasticity, Right neglect, Visual cortex, Visual field representation
Pubmed
Web of science
Create date
15/02/2019 15:04
Last modification date
20/08/2019 16:03
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