Kin discrimination allows plants to modify investment towards pollinator attraction.

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State: Public
Version: Final published version
Serval ID
serval:BIB_9B19DD7A89A5
Type
Article: article from journal or magazin.
Collection
Publications
Institution
Title
Kin discrimination allows plants to modify investment towards pollinator attraction.
Journal
Nature communications
Author(s)
Torices R., Gómez J.M., Pannell J.R.
ISSN
2041-1723 (Electronic)
ISSN-L
2041-1723
Publication state
Published
Issued date
22/05/2018
Peer-reviewed
Oui
Volume
9
Number
1
Pages
2018
Language
english
Notes
Publication types: Journal Article ; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Publication Status: epublish
Abstract
Pollinators tend to be preferentially attracted to large floral displays that may comprise more than one plant in a patch. Attracting pollinators thus not only benefits individuals investing in advertising, but also other plants in a patch through a 'magnet' effect. Accordingly, there could be an indirect fitness advantage to greater investment in costly floral displays by plants in kin-structured groups than when in groups of unrelated individuals. Here, we seek evidence for this strategy by manipulating relatedness in groups of the plant Moricandia moricandioides, an insect-pollinated herb that typically grows in patches. As predicted, individuals growing with kin, particularly at high density, produced larger floral displays than those growing with non-kin. Investment in attracting pollinators was thus moulded by the presence and relatedness of neighbours, exemplifying the importance of kin recognition in the evolution of plant reproductive strategies.
Keywords
Animals, Brassicaceae/anatomy & histology, Brassicaceae/classification, Brassicaceae/physiology, Flowers/anatomy & histology, Flowers/classification, Flowers/physiology, Insecta/physiology, Plant Physiological Phenomena, Pollination/physiology
Pubmed
Web of science
Open Access
Yes
Create date
11/06/2018 8:38
Last modification date
20/08/2019 16:02
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