Gender and cultural differences in the association between family roles, social stratification, and alcohol use: a European cross-cultural analysis.

Details

Serval ID
serval:BIB_9A2CD97033FC
Type
Article: article from journal or magazin.
Collection
Publications
Title
Gender and cultural differences in the association between family roles, social stratification, and alcohol use: a European cross-cultural analysis.
Journal
Alcohol and Alcoholism (oxford, Oxfordshire). Supplement
Author(s)
Kuntsche S., Gmel G., Knibbe R.A., Kuendig H., Bloomfield K., Kramer S., Grittner U.
ISSN
0735-0414
Publication state
Published
Issued date
11/2006
Volume
41
Number
1
Pages
i37-i46
Language
english
Notes
Publication types: Comparative Study ; Journal Article ; Multicenter Study ; Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural ; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Publication Status: ppublish
Abstract
AIMS: First, this paper investigates (i) gender differences in associations of social stratification, family roles, and heavy drinking, and (ii) country differences in these associations. Second, it seeks to explain country differences in the associations of social stratification and family roles with alcohol consumption by societal level variables.
METHODS: Survey data of 25 to 49-years-old from eight European countries were used. Logistic regressions were used to analyse gender differences in the association between family roles (marriage, having children), social stratification (education, employment), and heavy drinking (>20 g/day for women; 30 g/day for men). Gender differences were tested by means of interactions between gender and social stratification/family roles. Structural measures of work desirability, social welfare, and gender equity were used to explain differences in associations across countries.
RESULTS: The associations between social stratification, family roles, and heavy drinking varied across gender and countries. A country's social welfare system was associated with heavy drinking only among women. Women in countries with a strong social welfare system, such as Nordic countries, tended to drink more heavily if employed, having lower formal education, and a non-traditional family role. In countries with weak social welfare systems or work desirability, heavy drinking was associated with high education, while effects of family roles and employment were small.
CONCLUSIONS: It appeared that the social welfare system and gender equity of a country determines to a large extent how education, employment, and family roles are associated with heavy drinking.
Keywords
Adult, Alcohol Drinking/epidemiology, Alcohol Drinking/psychology, Cross-Cultural Comparison, Data Collection, Europe/epidemiology, Family Characteristics, Female, Humans, Logistic Models, Male, Middle Aged, Sex Characteristics, Social Class
Pubmed
Web of science
Open Access
Yes
Create date
25/01/2008 17:16
Last modification date
20/08/2019 15:01
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