Early event-related potential changes during working memory activation predict rapid decline in mild cognitive impairment.

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Serval ID
serval:BIB_98EFDD8AF645
Type
Article: article from journal or magazin.
Collection
Publications
Institution
Title
Early event-related potential changes during working memory activation predict rapid decline in mild cognitive impairment.
Journal
The Journals of Gerontology. Series A
Author(s)
Missonnier P., Gold G., Fazio-Costa L., Michel J.P., Mulligan R., Michon A., Ibáñez V., Giannakopoulos P.
ISSN
1079-5006
Publication state
Published
Issued date
2005
Peer-reviewed
Oui
Volume
60
Number
5
Pages
660-666
Language
english
Abstract
BACKGROUND: The conversion of mild cognitive impairment (MCI) to Alzheimer's disease is associated with substantial compromise of neocortical circuits subserving rapid cognitive functions such as working memory. Event-related potential (ERP) analysis is a powerful tool to identify early impairment of these circuits, yet research for an electrophysiological marker of cognitive deterioration in MCI is scarce. Using a "2-back" activation paradigm, we recently described an electrophysiological correlate of working memory activation (positive-negative working memory [PN(wm)] component) over parietal electrodes. METHODS: Ours was a longitudinal study of 24 MCI patients with ERP analysis at inclusion and neuropsychological follow-up after 1 year. We used ERP waveform subtraction analysis between the n-back and control tasks. Analysis of variance (ANOVA) was used to compare electroencephalograph latencies between progressive MCI (PMCI) and stable MCI (SMCI), and univariate regression was used to assess the relationship between neuropsychological measures at baseline and clinical outcome. RESULTS: Thirteen (54%) MCI patients showed PMCI, and 11 (46%) remained stable (SMCI). In SMCI, a PN(wm) component with significantly larger density compared to baseline was identified when subtracting the detection task for both the 1- and 2-back tasks. In contrast, in PMCI, the PN(wm) component was absent in both 1-back and 2-back conditions. Neuropsychological variables and n-back test performance at inclusion did not predict cognitive deterioration 1 year later. CONCLUSIONS: In conjunction with recent functional imaging data, the present results support the notion of an early dysfunction of neural generators within the parietal cortex in MCI. They also reveal that the absence of the PN(wm) component may provide an easily applicable qualitative predictive marker of rapid cognitive deterioration in MCI.
Keywords
Aged, Aged, 80 and over, Alzheimer Disease/diagnosis, Analysis of Variance, Cognition Disorders/diagnosis, Disease Progression, Electroencephalography, Evoked Potentials, Female, Follow-Up Studies, Geriatric Assessment, Humans, Longitudinal Studies, Male, Memory Disorders/diagnosis, Neuropsychological Tests, Probability, Risk Assessment, Sensitivity and Specificity, Severity of Illness Index, Statistics, Nonparametric
Pubmed
Web of science
Open Access
Yes
Create date
10/03/2008 12:04
Last modification date
25/09/2019 7:10
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