Gender Differences in Inflammatory Bowel Disease.

Details

Serval ID
serval:BIB_9838A05502A6
Type
Article: article from journal or magazin.
Publication sub-type
Review (review): journal as complete as possible of one specific subject, written based on exhaustive analyses from published work.
Collection
Publications
Institution
Title
Gender Differences in Inflammatory Bowel Disease.
Journal
Digestion
Author(s)
Greuter T., Manser C., Pittet V., Vavricka S.R., Biedermann L.
Working group(s)
on behalf of Swiss IBDnet, an official working group of the Swiss Society of Gastroenterology
ISSN
1421-9867 (Electronic)
ISSN-L
0012-2823
Publication state
Published
Issued date
2020
Peer-reviewed
Oui
Volume
101 Suppl 1
Pages
98-104
Language
english
Notes
Publication types: Journal Article ; Review
Publication Status: ppublish
Abstract
Immune-mediated diseases typically show a female preponderance. Looking at all autoimmune diseases combined, 8 of 10 patients are females. Although not as prominent, gender differences in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) have been reported for epidemiology, disease presentation, disease course and complications, medical and surgical therapies, adherence, psychosocial functioning, and psychiatric co-disorders. While for some factors evidence is rather good, for others data are conflicting. Gastroenterologists dealing with IBD patients in daily clinical practice should be aware of gender-specific issues for the following reasons: (1) misperception of disease presentation potentially delays IBD diagnosis, which has been shown to have deleterious effects, and (2) awareness of gender-specific symptoms and disease severity allows initiation of early and adequately tailored treatment. This might prevent development of complications. And (3) insights into gender-specific differences in terms of treatment and adherence to treatment can improve disease management and foster a more individualized treatment approach. In this review, we summarize current knowledge about gender-specific differences in IBD and highlight the most clinically relevant aspects.
Keywords
Disease activity, Disease course, Disease phenotype, Environmental factors, Epidemiology, Extraintestinal manifestations, Fatigue, Gender, Genetics, Inflammatory bowel disease, Psychological factors, Sex
Pubmed
Web of science
Open Access
Yes
Create date
31/01/2020 16:49
Last modification date
20/08/2022 5:40
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