Divergent effect of cobalt and beryllium salts on the fate of peripheral blood monocytes and T lymphocytes.

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Serval ID
serval:BIB_97524FCD847A
Type
Article: article from journal or magazin.
Collection
Publications
Institution
Title
Divergent effect of cobalt and beryllium salts on the fate of peripheral blood monocytes and T lymphocytes.
Journal
Toxicological Sciences
Author(s)
Paladini F., Cocco E., Potolicchio I., Fazekasova H., Lombardi G., Fiorillo M.T., Sorrentino R.
ISSN
1096-0929[electronic], 1096-0929[linking]
Publication state
Published
Issued date
2011
Volume
119
Number
2
Pages
257-269
Language
english
Abstract
Occupational exposure to metals such as cobalt and beryllium represents a risk factor for respiratory health and can cause immune-mediated diseases. However, the way they act may be different. We show here that the two metals have a divergent effect on peripheral T lymphocytes and monocytes: BeSO(4) induces cell death in monocytes but not in T lymphocytes, which instead respond by producing Interferon gamma (IFN-γ); conversely, CoCl(2) induces apoptosis in T lymphocytes but not in monocytes. Interestingly, both metals induce p53 overexpression but with a dramatic different outcome. This is because the effect of p53 in CoCl(2)-treated monocytes is counteracted by the antiapoptotic activity of cytoplasmic p21(Cip1/WAF1), the activation of nuclear factor κB, and the inflammasome danger signaling pathway leading to the production of proinflammatory cytokines. However, CoCl(2)-treated monocytes do not fully differentiate into macrophage or dendritic cells, as inferred by the lack of expression of CD16 and CD83, respectively. Furthermore, the expression of HLA-class II molecules, as well as the capability of capturing and presenting the antigens, decreased with time. In conclusion, cobalt keeps monocytes in a partially activated, proinflammatory state that can contribute to some of the pathologies associated with the exposure to this metal.
Pubmed
Web of science
Open Access
Yes
Create date
08/03/2011 9:15
Last modification date
25/09/2019 6:10
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