Evidence of an interannual effect of maternal immunization on the immune response of juveniles in a long-lived colonial bird.

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State: Public
Version: author
Serval ID
serval:BIB_9737A3A37E6E
Type
Article: article from journal or magazin.
Collection
Publications
Institution
Title
Evidence of an interannual effect of maternal immunization on the immune response of juveniles in a long-lived colonial bird.
Journal
Journal of Animal Ecology
Author(s)
Staszewski V., Gasparini J., McCoy K.D., Tveraa T., Boulinier T.
ISSN
0021-8790[print], 0021-8790[linking]
Publication state
Published
Issued date
2007
Peer-reviewed
Oui
Volume
76
Number
6
Pages
1215-1223
Language
english
Notes
Publication types: Journal Article ; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Publication Status: ppublish
Abstract
Little is known about the maternal transfer of antibodies in natural host-parasite systems despite its possible evolutionary and ecological implications. In domestic animals, the maternal transfer of antibodies can enhance offspring survival via a temporary protection against parasites, but it can also interfere with the juvenile immune response to antigens. We tested the functional role of maternal antibodies in a natural population of a long-lived colonial seabird, the kittiwake (Rissa tridactyla), using a vaccine (Newcastle disease virus vaccine) to mimic parasite exposure combined with a cross-fostering design. We first investigated the role of prior maternal exposure on the interannual transmission of Ab to juveniles. We then tested the effect of these antibodies on the juvenile immune response to the same antigen. The results show that specific maternal antibodies were transferred to chicks 1 year after maternal exposure and that these antibodies were functional, i.e. they affected juvenile immunity. These results suggest that the role of maternal antibodies may depend on the timing and pattern of offspring exposure to parasites, along with the patterns of maternal exposure and the dynamics of her immune response. Overall, our approach underlines that although the transgenerational transfer of antibodies in natural populations is likely to have broad implications, the nature of these effects may vary dramatically among host-parasite systems, depending on the physiological mechanisms involved and the ecological context.
Keywords
Animals, Antibodies, Viral/blood, Bird Diseases/immunology, Bird Diseases/parasitology, Birds, Female, Host-Parasite Interactions/immunology, Immunity, Maternally-Acquired, Male, Newcastle disease virus/immunology, Ovum/immunology, Ovum/metabolism
Pubmed
Web of science
Open Access
Yes
Create date
24/01/2008 17:42
Last modification date
20/08/2019 14:59
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