Valence lasts longer than arousal : persistence of induced moods as assessed by psychophysiological measures

Details

Serval ID
serval:BIB_9684F2523EE0
Type
Inproceedings: an article in a conference proceedings.
Publication sub-type
Abstract (Abstract): shot summary in a article that contain essentials elements presented during a scientific conference, lecture or from a poster.
Collection
Publications
Institution
Title
Valence lasts longer than arousal : persistence of induced moods as assessed by psychophysiological measures
Title of the conference
Joint Annual Meeting of the Swiss Respiratory Society, Swiss Society of Occupational Medicine, Swiss Paediatric Respiratory Society, Swiss Society for Thoracic Surgery, Davos (Switzerland), April 16/17, 2009
Author(s)
Gomez Patrick, Zimmermann Philippe, Guttormsen-Schär Sissel, Danuser Brigitta
ISBN
1424-7860
Publication state
Published
Issued date
2009
Peer-reviewed
Oui
Volume
139
Series
Swiss Medical Weekly
Pages
9S
Language
english
Notes
SAPHIRID:78931
Abstract
How long induced moods last is a critical question for mood research but has been only poorly addressed. In particular, physiological parameters have been rarely included to assess the effectiveness of mood induction procedures. Adopting a dimensional model of mood, we investigated the persistence of four different moods (positive higharousal, positive low-arousal, negative high-arousal, negative lowarousal) induced by four film clips ("sport", "nature", "torture", "slum") during a 9-minute computer task. We measured subjective mood state (valence and arousal), respiration, skin conductance level (SCL), heart rate, and corrugator activity in 76 subjects. Viewing of the selected film clips induced the expected effects both subjectively and physiologically. Corrugator activity was higher at the end of the negative clips than the positive clips, and ventilation and SCL were higher for the arousing clips than for the less arousing clips. People who watched the negative clips still reported more negative valence after the computer task and also showed more facial frowning (cf. figure) and lower SCL during the task than people who watched the positive clips. No arousal effects persisted throughout the task. The results suggest that induced changes in the valence dimension of moods are maintained throughout an intervening task and are physiologically best reflected by corrugator activity and SCL, whereas induced changes in the arousal dimension dissipate quickly. The findings of this study enrich, first, our knowledge concerning the relationships between subjective feelings and their physiological substrate. Second, they inform us about the effectiveness of film clips as a mood induction instrument. Third and most important, they suggest that induced changes in valence last longer than induced changes in arousal. High-arousal moods can last for an extended period of time in daily life, but they seem to be short-lived when induced in the lab. An important methodological consequence is that investigating the effect of the arousal dimension of a person's mood induced in the lab may be only possible when the subsequent task is relatively short. Finally, the findings show which physiological measures may be useful in tracking mood states.
Keywords
Mood Disorders , Arousal
Create date
27/01/2010 12:20
Last modification date
20/08/2019 14:58
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