Cigarette smoking during pregnancy and adverse perinatal outcomes: a cross-sectional study over 10 years.

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State: Public
Version: Final published version
License: CC BY 4.0
Serval ID
serval:BIB_9669C42CAA8E
Type
Article: article from journal or magazin.
Collection
Publications
Institution
Title
Cigarette smoking during pregnancy and adverse perinatal outcomes: a cross-sectional study over 10 years.
Journal
BMC public health
Author(s)
Tarasi B., Cornuz J., Clair C., Baud D.
ISSN
1471-2458 (Electronic)
ISSN-L
1471-2458
Publication state
Published
Issued date
21/12/2022
Peer-reviewed
Oui
Volume
22
Number
1
Pages
2403
Language
english
Notes
Publication types: Journal Article ; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Publication Status: epublish
Abstract
It has been shown that active exposure to tobacco is associated with adverse pregnancy outcomes including, but not limited to, intrauterine fetal death, reduced fetal weight, and higher risk of preterm birth. We want to investigate these effects in a high-income country.
This cross-sectional study examined 20,843 pregnant women who delivered over 10 years at the Maternity Hospital of the Centre Hospitalier Universitaire Vaudois (CHUV) in Lausanne, Switzerland. The objective was to evaluate a dose-response relationship between daily cigarette use during pregnancy and possible adverse perinatal outcomes. The social and clinical characteristics as well as obstetric and neonatal outcomes were compared between the smoking and the non-smoking groups. Adjusted odds ratios (aOR) and trend analyses (p <sub>trend</sub> ) were calculated.
Nineteen thousand five hundred fifty-four pregnant women met the inclusion criteria and 2,714 (13.9%) of them were smokers. Even after adjusting for confounding factors, smoking during pregnancy was associated with preterm birth, birthweight < 2500 g, intrauterine growth restriction, neonatal respiratory and gastrointestinal diseases, transfer to the neonatal intensive care unit, and neonatal intensive care unit admissions > 7 days. Intrauterine death and neonatal infection were associated with heavy smoking (≥ 20 cigarettes/day). Smoking appeared to be a protective factor for pre-eclampsia and umbilical cord arterial pH below 7.1. A significant trend (p <sub>trend</sub> < 0.05) was identified for preterm birth, intrauterine growth restriction, birthweight < 2500 g, umbilical cord arterial pH below 7.1, transfers to our neonatal intensive care unit, and neonatal intensive care unit admissions more than 7 days.
Cigarette smoking is associated with several adverse perinatal outcomes of pregnancy with a dose-dependent effect.
Keywords
Infant, Newborn, Pregnancy, Female, Humans, Premature Birth/epidemiology, Birth Weight, Fetal Growth Retardation/epidemiology, Fetal Growth Retardation/etiology, Cross-Sectional Studies, Cigarette Smoking/epidemiology, Tobacco, Pregnancy Outcome/epidemiology, Stillbirth, Birthweight, Intrauterine growth restriction, Perinatal outcomes, Preterm birth, Smoking during pregnancy
Pubmed
Open Access
Yes
Create date
04/01/2023 11:06
Last modification date
25/01/2023 7:13
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