Mobile phone use and brain tumors in children and adolescents: a multicenter case-control study.

Details

Serval ID
serval:BIB_94DF394F0DD1
Type
Article: article from journal or magazin.
Collection
Publications
Title
Mobile phone use and brain tumors in children and adolescents: a multicenter case-control study.
Journal
Journal of the National Cancer Institute
Author(s)
Aydin D., Feychting M., Schüz J., Tynes T., Andersen T.V., Schmidt L.S., Poulsen A.H., Johansen C., Prochazka M., Lannering B., Klæboe L., Eggen T., Jenni D., Grotzer M., Von der Weid N., Kuehni C.E., Röösli M.
ISSN
1460-2105 (Electronic)
ISSN-L
0027-8874
Publication state
Published
Issued date
2011
Volume
103
Number
16
Pages
1264-76
Language
english
Abstract
Background It has been hypothesized that children and adolescents might be more vulnerable to possible health effects from mobile phone exposure than adults. We investigated whether mobile phone use is associated with brain tumor risk among children and adolescents. Methods CEFALO is a multicenter case-control study conducted in Denmark, Sweden, Norway, and Switzerland that includes all children and adolescents aged 7-19 years who were diagnosed with a brain tumor between 2004 and 2008. We conducted interviews, in person, with 352 case patients (participation rate: 83%) and 646 control subjects (participation rate: 71%) and their parents. Control subjects were randomly selected from population registries and matched by age, sex, and geographical region. We asked about mobile phone use and included mobile phone operator records when available. Odds ratios (ORs) for brain tumor risk and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated using conditional logistic regression models. Results Regular users of mobile phones were not statistically significantly more likely to have been diagnosed with brain tumors compared with nonusers (OR = 1.36; 95% CI = 0.92 to 2.02). Children who started to use mobile phones at least 5 years ago were not at increased risk compared with those who had never regularly used mobile phones (OR = 1.26, 95% CI = 0.70 to 2.28). In a subset of study participants for whom operator recorded data were available, brain tumor risk was related to the time elapsed since the mobile phone subscription was started but not to amount of use. No increased risk of brain tumors was observed for brain areas receiving the highest amount of exposure. Conclusion The absence of an exposure-response relationship either in terms of the amount of mobile phone use or by localization of the brain tumor argues against a causal association.
Pubmed
Web of science
Open Access
Yes
Create date
05/09/2011 9:29
Last modification date
20/08/2019 15:57
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