Rate of metabolism in the smallest simian primate, the pygmy marmoset (Cebuella pygmaea).

Details

Serval ID
serval:BIB_948
Type
Article: article from journal or magazin.
Collection
Publications
Institution
Title
Rate of metabolism in the smallest simian primate, the pygmy marmoset (Cebuella pygmaea).
Journal
American Journal of Primatology
Author(s)
Genoud M., Martin R.D., Glaser D.
ISSN
0275-2565 (Print)
ISSN-L
0275-2565
Publication state
Published
Issued date
1997
Volume
41
Number
3
Pages
229-245
Language
english
Notes
Publication types: Journal Article ; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Publication Status: ppublish
Abstract
Rate of metabolism was measured with six adult pygmy marmosets (Cebuella pygmaea) at regulated ambient temperatures ranging between 20 degrees C and 35 degrees C. A novel combined nest box and metabolic chamber was designed to allow nighttime measurements on immobile animals in their home cage without disturbance. The basal rate of metabolism (BMR) was 98 ml O2 h-1, representing 74% of the value expected from the equation of McNab [Quarterly Review of Biology 63:25-54, 1988] relative to body mass. The thermoneutral zone was approximately 27-34 degrees C. Below the lower critical temperature (27-28 degrees C), thermal conductance (12.9 ml O2 h-1 degree C-1) was close to the predicted value. Body temperature ranged between 34.9 degrees C and 35.5 degrees C at night. When two animals rested together overnight in the nest box, the lower critical temperature was slightly lowered, and individual energy expenditure at 20-21 degrees C was reduced by about 34%. The basal rate of metabolism of C. pygmaea is much lower than reported in an earlier study based on daytime measurements but agrees with values reported from a more recent study conducted at night with a classical metabolic chamber. In order to compare the BMR of C. pygmaea with that of other primates, 23 species were included in a comparative study taking into account both phylogeny and body mass (independent contrasts approach). The scaling exponent of BMR to body mass obtained was indistinguishable from that published for eutherian mammals in general. Cebuella and Callithrix exhibit the lowest basal rates known for simians. This trait may possibly be linked to the natural diet, which includes a large proportion of gums that are difficult to digest, but additional metabolic studies on primates are needed for further examination of its adaptive significance.
Keywords
Animals, Basal Metabolism/physiology, Body Constitution, Body Temperature Regulation/physiology, Callitrichinae/metabolism, Female, Male, Oxygen Consumption
Pubmed
Create date
19/11/2007 10:40
Last modification date
20/08/2019 14:57
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