Safety and Tolerability of Adoptive Cell Therapy in Cancer.

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Version: Author's accepted manuscript
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Serval ID
serval:BIB_944ED4AF4291
Type
Article: article from journal or magazin.
Publication sub-type
Review (review): journal as complete as possible of one specific subject, written based on exhaustive analyses from published work.
Collection
Publications
Institution
Title
Safety and Tolerability of Adoptive Cell Therapy in Cancer.
Journal
Drug safety
Author(s)
Wolf B., Zimmermann S., Arber C., Irving M., Trueb L., Coukos G.
ISSN
1179-1942 (Electronic)
ISSN-L
0114-5916
Publication state
Published
Issued date
02/2019
Peer-reviewed
Oui
Volume
42
Number
2
Pages
315-334
Language
english
Notes
Publication types: Journal Article ; Review
Publication Status: ppublish
Abstract
Adoptive T cell therapy (ACT) is a safe and effective personalized cancer immunotherapy that can comprise naturally occurring ex vivo expanded cells (e.g., tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes [TIL]) or T cells genetically engineered to confer antigen specificity (T-cell receptor [TCR] or chimeric antigen receptor [CAR] engineered T cells) to mediate cancer rejection. In recent years, some ACTs have produced unprecedented breakthrough responses: TIL therapy has moved from melanoma to solid tumor applications, TCR-engineered cells are developed for hematologic and solid tumors, and CAR-engineered T cells have received Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approval for the treatment of patients with certain B-cell malignancies. Although results are encouraging, to date, only a small percentage of patients with advanced malignancies can benefit from ACT. Besides ACT availability and accessibility, treatment-related toxicities represent a major hurdle in the widespread implementation of this therapeutic modality. The large variety of observed toxicities is caused by the infused cell product or as side effects of accompanying medication and chemotherapy. Toxicities can occur immediately or can be delayed. In order to render those highly promising therapeutic approaches safe enough for a wider pool of patients outside of clinical trials, an international consensus for toxicity management needs to be established.
Keywords
Animals, Antineoplastic Agents/adverse effects, Antineoplastic Agents/pharmacology, Antineoplastic Agents/therapeutic use, Clinical Trials as Topic/methods, Humans, Immunotherapy, Adoptive/adverse effects, Immunotherapy, Adoptive/methods, Neoplasms/drug therapy, Neoplasms/immunology, Neoplasms/metabolism, Nervous System Diseases/chemically induced, Nervous System Diseases/metabolism, T-Lymphocytes/drug effects, T-Lymphocytes/immunology, T-Lymphocytes/metabolism
Pubmed
Web of science
Create date
08/02/2019 13:50
Last modification date
20/08/2019 15:56
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