Assessment of lactase activity in humans by measurement of galactitol and galactonate in serum and urine after milk intake.

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License: CC BY-NC 4.0
Serval ID
serval:BIB_907D7D5DF28C
Type
Article: article from journal or magazin.
Collection
Publications
Institution
Title
Assessment of lactase activity in humans by measurement of galactitol and galactonate in serum and urine after milk intake.
Journal
The American journal of clinical nutrition
Author(s)
Vionnet N., Münger L.H., Freiburghaus C., Burton K.J., Pimentel G., Pralong F.P., Badertscher R., Vergères G.
ISSN
1938-3207 (Electronic)
ISSN-L
0002-9165
Publication state
Published
Issued date
01/02/2019
Peer-reviewed
Oui
Volume
109
Number
2
Pages
470-477
Language
english
Notes
Publication types: Journal Article ; Validation Studies
Publication Status: ppublish
Abstract
Lactase is an enzyme that hydrolyzes lactose into glucose and galactose in the small intestine, where they are absorbed. Hypolactasia is a common condition, primarily caused by genetic programming, that leads to lactose maldigestion and, in certain cases, lactose intolerance. Galactitol and galactonate are 2 products of hepatic galactose metabolism that are candidate markers for the intake of lactose-containing foods.
The primary objective of the study was to explore the changes in serum and urine metabolomes during postprandial dairy product tests through the association between lactase persistence genotype and the postprandial dynamics of lactose-derived metabolites.
We characterized the 6-h postprandial serum kinetics and urinary excretion of lactose, galactose, galactitol, and galactonate in 14 healthy men who had consumed a single dose of acidified milk (800 g) which contained 38.8 g lactose. Genotyping of LCT-13910 C/T (rs4988235) was performed to assess primary lactase persistence.
There were 2 distinct postprandial responses, classified as high and low metabolite responses, observed for galactose, and its metabolites galactitol and galactonate, in serum and urine. In all but 1 subject, there was a concordance between the high metabolite responses and genetic lactase persistence and between the low metabolite responses and genetic lactase nonpersistence (accuracy 0.92), galactitol and galactonate being more discriminative than galactose.
Postprandial galactitol and galactonate after lactose overload appear to be good proxies for genetically determined lactase activity. The development of a noninvasive lactose digestion test based on the measurement of these metabolites in urine could be clinically useful. This trial was registered at clinicaltrials.gov as NCT02230345.
Keywords
Adult, Animals, Biomarkers/metabolism, Dairy Products/adverse effects, Digestion/genetics, Galactitol/blood, Galactitol/metabolism, Galactitol/urine, Galactose/blood, Galactose/metabolism, Galactose/urine, Genotype, Humans, Lactase/deficiency, Lactase/genetics, Lactase/metabolism, Lactose/blood, Lactose/metabolism, Lactose/urine, Lactose Intolerance/genetics, Lactose Intolerance/metabolism, Liver, Male, Milk/adverse effects, Milk/chemistry, Nutrition Assessment, Polymorphism, Single Nucleotide, Postprandial Period, Sugar Acids/blood, Sugar Acids/metabolism, Sugar Acids/urine, Young Adult
Pubmed
Web of science
Open Access
Yes
Create date
18/03/2019 19:08
Last modification date
26/10/2019 5:09
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