What makes a host profitable? Parasites balance host nutritive resources against immunity.

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State: Public
Version: author
Serval ID
serval:BIB_9057BC89FEB2
Type
Article: article from journal or magazin.
Collection
Publications
Institution
Title
What makes a host profitable? Parasites balance host nutritive resources against immunity.
Journal
American Naturalist
Author(s)
Bize P., Jeanneret C., Klopfenstein A., Roulin A.
ISSN
1537-5323[electronic], 0003-0147[linking]
Publication state
Published
Issued date
2008
Peer-reviewed
Oui
Volume
171
Number
1
Pages
107-118
Language
english
Notes
Publication types: Journal Article ; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't Publication Status: ppublish
Abstract
Numerous host qualities can modulate parasite fitness, and among these, host nutritive resources and immunity are of prime importance. Indeed, parasite fitness increases with the amount of nutritive resources extracted from the host body and decreases with host immune response. To maximize fitness, parasites have therefore to balance these two host components. Yet, because host nutritive resources and immunity both increase with host body condition, it is unclear whether parasites perform better on hosts in prime, intermediate, or poor condition. We investigated blood meal size and survival of the ectoparasitic louse fly Crataerina melbae in relation to body condition and cutaneous immune response of their Alpine swift (Apus melba) nestling hosts. Louse flies took a smaller blood meal and lived a shorter period of time when feeding on nestlings that were experimentally food deprived or had their cutaneous immune response boosted with methionine. Consistent with these results, louse fly survival was the highest when feeding on nonexperimental nestlings in intermediate body condition. Our findings emphasize that although hosts in poor condition had a reduced immunocompetence, parasites may have avoided them because individuals in poor condition did not provide adequate resources. These findings highlight the fact that giving host immunocompetence primary consideration can result in a biased appraisal of host-parasite interactions.
Keywords
Animals, Birds/immunology, Birds/parasitology, Body Constitution, Body Size, Diptera/physiology, Feeding Behavior/physiology, Female, Host-Parasite Interactions, Methionine
Pubmed
Web of science
Create date
24/01/2008 17:42
Last modification date
20/08/2019 14:53
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