Transapical aortic valve replacement in extreme-risk patients: outcome, risk factors and mid-term results.

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Serval ID
serval:BIB_8E58FC9BA1D9
Type
Article: article from journal or magazin.
Collection
Publications
Institution
Title
Transapical aortic valve replacement in extreme-risk patients: outcome, risk factors and mid-term results.
Journal
European Journal of Cardio-thoracic Surgery
Author(s)
Ferrari E., Namasivayam J., Marcucci C., Gronchi F., Berdajs D., Niclauss L., von Segesser L.K.
ISSN
1010-7940
1873-734X (Electronic)
ISSN-L
1010-7940
Publication state
Published
Issued date
2013
Volume
43
Number
5
Pages
978-985
Language
english
Notes
Publication types: Journal ArticlePublication Status: ppublish
Abstract
OBJECTIVES: Transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) provides good results in selected high-risk patients. However, it is unclear whether this procedure carries advantages in extreme-risk profile patients with logistic EuroSCORE above 35%.
METHODS: From January 2009 to July 2011, of a total number of 92 transcatheter aortic valve procedures performed, 40 'extreme-risk' patients underwent transapical TAVR (TA-TAVR) (EuroSCORE above 35%). Variables were analysed as risk factors for hospital and mid-term mortality, and a 2-year follow-up (FU) was obtained.
RESULTS: The mean age was: 81 ± 10 years. Twelve patients (30%) had chronic pulmonary disease, 32 (80%) severe peripheral vascular disease, 14 (35%) previous cardiac surgery, 19 (48%) chronic renal failure (2 in dialysis), 7 (17%) previous stroke (1 with disabilities), 3 (7%) a porcelain aorta and 12 (30%) were urgent cases. Mean left ventricle ejection fraction (LVEF) was 49 ± 13%, and mean logistic EuroSCORE was 48 ± 11%. Forty stent-valves were successfully implanted with six Grade-1 and one Grade-2 paravalvular leakages (success rate: 100%). Hospital mortality was 20% (8 patients). Causes of death following the valve academic research consortium (VARC) definitions were: life-threatening haemorrhage (1), myocardial infarction (1), sudden death (1), multiorgan failure (2), stroke (1) and severe respiratory dysfunction (2). Major complications (VARC definitions) were: myocardial infarction for left coronary ostium occlusion (1), life-threatening bleeding (2), stroke (2) and acute kidney injury with dialysis (2). Predictors for hospital mortality were: conversion to sternotomy, life-threatening haemorrhage, postoperative dialysis and long intensive care unit (ICU) stay. Variables associated with hospital mortality were: conversion to sternotomy (P = 0.03), life-threatening bleeding (P = 0.02), acute kidney injury with dialysis (P = 0.03) and prolonged ICU stay (P = 0.02). Mean FU time was 24 months: actuarial survival estimates for all-cause mortality at 6 months, 1 year, 18 months and 2 years were 68, 57, 54 and 54%, respectively. Patients still alive at FU were in good clinical condition, New York Heart Association (NYHA) class 1-2 and were never rehospitalized for cardiac decompensation.
CONCLUSIONS: TA-TAVR in extreme-risk patients carries a moderate risk of hospital mortality. Severe comorbidities and presence of residual paravalvular leakages affect the mid-term survival, whereas surviving patients have an acceptable quality of life without rehospitalizations for cardiac decompensation.
Pubmed
Web of science
Open Access
Yes
Create date
31/05/2013 17:16
Last modification date
25/09/2019 7:09
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