AltitudeOmics: cerebral autoregulation during ascent, acclimatization, and re-exposure to high altitude and its relation with acute mountain sickness.

Details

Serval ID
serval:BIB_8E2C42289F30
Type
Article: article from journal or magazin.
Collection
Publications
Institution
Title
AltitudeOmics: cerebral autoregulation during ascent, acclimatization, and re-exposure to high altitude and its relation with acute mountain sickness.
Journal
Journal of Applied Physiology (bethesda, Md. : 1985)
Author(s)
Subudhi A.W., Fan J.L., Evero O., Bourdillon N., Kayser B., Julian C.G., Lovering A.T., Panerai R.B., Roach R.C.
ISSN
1522-1601 (Electronic)
ISSN-L
0161-7567
Publication state
Published
Issued date
2014
Volume
116
Number
7
Pages
724-729
Language
english
Notes
Publication types: Journal Article ; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't ; Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.
Publication Status: ppublish
Abstract
Cerebral autoregulation (CA) acts to maintain brain blood flow despite fluctuations in perfusion pressure. Acute hypoxia is thought to impair CA, but it is unclear if CA is affected by acclimatization or related to the development of acute mountain sickness (AMS). We assessed changes in CA using transfer function analysis of spontaneous fluctuations in radial artery blood pressure (indwelling catheter) and resulting changes in middle cerebral artery blood flow velocity (transcranial Doppler) in 21 active individuals at sea level upon arrival at 5,260 m (ALT1), after 16 days of acclimatization (ALT16), and upon re-exposure to 5,260 m after 7 days at 1,525 m (POST7). The Lake Louise Questionnaire was used to evaluate AMS symptom severity. CA was impaired upon arrival at ALT1 (P < 0.001) and did not change with acclimatization at ALT16 or upon re-exposure at POST7. CA was not associated with AMS symptoms (all R < 0.50, P > 0.05). These findings suggest that alterations in CA are an intrinsic consequence of hypoxia and are not directly related to the occurrence or severity of AMS.
Pubmed
Create date
15/12/2014 19:19
Last modification date
24/01/2020 7:26
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