The costs of crossing paths and switching tasks between audition and vision.

Details

Serval ID
serval:BIB_8D6B4C9C5904
Type
Article: article from journal or magazin.
Collection
Publications
Title
The costs of crossing paths and switching tasks between audition and vision.
Journal
Brain and Cognition
Author(s)
Murray M.M., De Santis L., Thut G., Wylie G.R.
ISSN
1090-2147[electronic]
Publication state
Published
Issued date
2009
Volume
69
Number
1
Pages
47-55
Language
english
Abstract
Switching from one functional or cognitive operation to another is thought to rely on executive/control processes. The efficacy of these processes may depend on the extent of overlap between neural circuitry mediating the different tasks; more effective task preparation (and by extension smaller switch costs) is achieved when this overlap is small. We investigated the performance costs associated with switching tasks and/or switching sensory modalities. Participants discriminated either the identity or spatial location of objects that were presented either visually or acoustically. Switch costs between tasks were significantly smaller when the sensory modality of the task switched versus when it repeated. This was the case irrespective of whether the pre-trial cue informed participants only of the upcoming task, but not sensory modality (Experiment 1) or whether the pre-trial cue was informative about both the upcoming task and sensory modality (Experiment 2). In addition, in both experiments switch costs between the senses were positively correlated when the sensory modality of the task repeated across trials and not when it switched. The collective evidence supports the independence of control processes mediating task switching and modality switching and also the hypothesis that switch costs reflect competitive interference between neural circuits.
Keywords
Adult, Analysis of Variance, Auditory Perception, Cues, Discrimination (Psychology), Female, Humans, Male, Reaction Time, Space Perception, Task Performance and Analysis, Visual Perception, Young Adult
Pubmed
Web of science
Create date
12/10/2009 12:57
Last modification date
20/08/2019 15:51
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