Immune challenges increase network centrality in a queenless ant.

Details

Serval ID
serval:BIB_8D1730E6499D
Type
Article: article from journal or magazin.
Collection
Publications
Institution
Title
Immune challenges increase network centrality in a queenless ant.
Journal
Proceedings. Biological sciences
Author(s)
Alciatore G., Ugelvig L.V., Frank E., Bidaux J., Gal A., Schmitt T., Kronauer DJC, Ulrich Y.
ISSN
1471-2954 (Electronic)
ISSN-L
0962-8452
Publication state
Published
Issued date
08/09/2021
Peer-reviewed
Oui
Volume
288
Number
1958
Pages
20211456
Language
english
Notes
Publication types: Journal Article ; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Publication Status: ppublish
Abstract
Social animals display a wide range of behavioural defences against infectious diseases, some of which increase social contacts with infectious individuals (e.g. mutual grooming), while others decrease them (e.g. social exclusion). These defences often rely on the detection of infectious individuals, but this can be achieved in several ways that are difficult to differentiate. Here, we combine non-pathogenic immune challenges with automated tracking in colonies of the clonal raider ant to ask whether ants can detect the immune status of their social partners and to quantify their behavioural responses to this perceived infection risk. We first show that a key behavioural response elicited by live pathogens (allogrooming) can be qualitatively recapitulated by immune challenges alone. Automated scoring of interactions between all colony members reveals that this behavioural response increases the network centrality of immune-challenged individuals through a general increase in physical contacts. These results show that ants can detect the immune status of their nest-mates and respond with a general 'caring' strategy, rather than avoidance, towards social partners that are perceived to be infectious. Finally, we find no evidence that changes in cuticular hydrocarbon profiles drive these behavioural effects.
Keywords
Animals, Ants, Behavior, Animal, Grooming, Humans, Hydrocarbons, Social Behavior, automated tracking, clonal raider ant, interaction network, social behaviour, social immunity
Pubmed
Web of science
Open Access
Yes
Create date
04/10/2021 13:21
Last modification date
23/01/2024 8:16
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