Grief after patient death: direct care staff in nursing homes and homecare.

Details

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State: Public
Version: author
Serval ID
serval:BIB_8CBEA9510EEA
Type
Article: article from journal or magazin.
Collection
Publications
Institution
Title
Grief after patient death: direct care staff in nursing homes and homecare.
Journal
Journal of pain and symptom management
Author(s)
Boerner K., Burack O.R., Jopp D.S., Mock S.E.
ISSN
1873-6513 (Electronic)
ISSN-L
0885-3924
Publication state
Published
Issued date
02/2015
Peer-reviewed
Oui
Volume
49
Number
2
Pages
214-222
Language
english
Notes
Publication types: Comparative Study ; Journal Article ; Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural ; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Publication Status: ppublish
Abstract
Patient death is common in long-term care (LTC). Yet, little attention has been paid to how direct care staff members, who provide the bulk of daily LTC, experience patient death and to what extent they are prepared for this experience.
To 1) determine how grief symptoms typically reported by bereaved family caregivers are experienced among direct care staff, 2) explore how prepared the staff members were for the death of their patients, and 3) identify characteristics associated with their grief.
This was a cross-sectional study of direct care staff experiencing recent patient death. Participants were 140 certified nursing assistants and 80 homecare workers. Standardized assessments and structured questions addressed staff (e.g., preparedness for death), institutional (e.g., support availability), and patient/relational factors (e.g., relationship quality). Data analyses included bivariate group comparisons and hierarchical regression.
Grief reactions of staff reflected many of the core grief symptoms reported by bereaved family caregivers in a large-scale caregiving study. Feelings of being "not at all prepared" for the death and struggling with "acceptance of death" were prevalent among the staff. Grief was more intense when staff-patient relationships were closer, care was provided for longer, and staff felt emotionally unprepared for the death.
Grief symptoms like those experienced by family caregivers are common among direct care workers after patient death. Increasing preparedness for this experience via better training and support is likely to improve the occupational experience of direct care workers and ultimately allow them to provide better palliative care in nursing homes and homecare.

Keywords
Adult, Aged, Bereavement, Caregivers/psychology, Cross-Sectional Studies, Death, Family/psychology, Female, Grief, Health Personnel/psychology, Home Care Services, Humans, Long-Term Care/psychology, Male, Middle Aged, Nursing Homes, Professional-Family Relations, Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic, Regression Analysis, Young Adult, bereavement, caregiving, direct care staff, homecare workers, nursing assistants, patient death, preparedness
Pubmed
Web of science
Create date
23/10/2014 10:32
Last modification date
20/08/2019 15:51
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