Honey bee waggle dance communication: signal meaning and signal noise affect dance follower behaviour

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State: Public
Version: author
Serval ID
serval:BIB_8CB2CCD9630B
Type
Article: article from journal or magazin.
Collection
Publications
Title
Honey bee waggle dance communication: signal meaning and signal noise affect dance follower behaviour
Journal
Behavioral Ecology and Sociobiology
Author(s)
Al Toufailia H., Couvillon M.J., Ratnieks F.L.W., Grüter C.
ISSN
1432-0762 (Electronic)
ISSN-L
0340-5443 (Print)
Publication state
Published
Issued date
2013
Peer-reviewed
Oui
Volume
67
Number
4
Pages
549-556
Language
english
Abstract
Returning honey bee foragers perform waggle dances to inform nestmate foragers about the presence, location and odour of profitable food sources and new nest sites. The aim of this study is to investigate how the characteristics of waggle dances for natural food sources and environmental factors affect dance follower behaviour. Because food source profitability tends to decrease with increasing foraging distance, we hypothesised that the attractiveness of a dance, measured as the number of dance followers and their attendance, decreases with increasing distance to the advertised food location. Additionally, we determined whether time of year and dance signal noise, quantified as the variation in waggle run direction and duration, affect dance follower behaviour. Our results suggest that bees follow fewer waggle runs as the food source distance increases, but that they invest more time in following each dance. This is because waggle run duration increases with increasing foraging distance. Followers responded to increased angular noise in dances indicating more distant food sources by following more waggle runs per dance than when angular noise was low. The number of dance followers per dancing bee was also affected by the time of year and varied among colonies. Our results provide evidence that both noise in the message, that is variation in the direction component, and the message itself, that is the distance of the advertised food location, affect dance following. These results indicate that dance followers may pay attention to the costs and benefits associated with using dance information.
Keywords
Apis mellifera, Waggle dance, Foraging, Honey bee, Communication, Signal noise
Web of science
Create date
21/02/2014 11:12
Last modification date
20/08/2019 15:51
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