Motoric Cognitive Risk Syndrome Subtypes and Cognitive Profiles.

Details

Serval ID
serval:BIB_8C404A3EA549
Type
Article: article from journal or magazin.
Collection
Publications
Institution
Title
Motoric Cognitive Risk Syndrome Subtypes and Cognitive Profiles.
Journal
The journals of gerontology. Series A, Biological sciences and medical sciences
Author(s)
Allali G., Ayers E.I., Verghese J.
ISSN
1758-535X (Electronic)
ISSN-L
1079-5006
Publication state
Published
Issued date
03/2016
Peer-reviewed
Oui
Volume
71
Number
3
Pages
378-384
Language
english
Notes
Publication types: Journal Article ; Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural ; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Publication Status: ppublish
Abstract
The motoric cognitive risk (MCR) syndrome, characterized by slow gait and cognitive complaints, is a simple and easily accessible clinical approach to identify older adults at high risk for transitioning to dementia. This study aims to define subtypes of MCR based on individual quantitative gait variables and to compare their neuropsychological profiles and risk factors as well risk for incident cognitive impairment.
MCR was diagnosed in 314 community-residing, nondemented, older adults aged 65 and older (56% women) based on the presence of cognitive complaints and slow gait velocity (MCRv). Four new subtypes of MCR were defined by substituting slow gait with short stride length (MCRsl), slow swing time (MCRsw), high stride length variability (MCRslv), and high swing time variability (MCRswv). MCR subtypes were not mutually exclusive.
A total of 25 participants (8%) met criteria for MCRv, 20 for MCRsl (6.4%), 15 for MCRsw (4.8%), 16 for MCRslv (5.1%), 12 for MCRswv (3.8%), and 266 participants (84.7%) did not meet criteria for any MCR subtype. At baseline, MCRv was associated with deficits in attention and language as well as in overall cognitive status. MCRswv was associated with deficits in all cognitive domains including memory. Obesity and sedentariness were risk factors of MCRv, MCRsl, and MCRsw. MCRv status predicted incident cognitive impairment in global cognition (odds ratio: 3.59, p = .016), whereas MCRswv status predicted incident cognitive impairment in memory (odds ratio: 4.24, p = .048).
MCR subtypes based on individual gait parameters show commonalities and differences in cognitive profiles and risk factors. Future studies should investigate whether the MCR subtypes predict different subtypes of dementia.
Keywords
Aged, Aged, 80 and over, Aging/physiology, Cognition/physiology, Cognition Disorders/epidemiology, Cognition Disorders/physiopathology, Female, Follow-Up Studies, Gait/physiology, Humans, Incidence, Male, Motor Activity/physiology, Neuropsychological Tests, New York/epidemiology, Prognosis, Prospective Studies, Risk Factors, Syndrome, Dementia., Gait, Motoric cognitive risk syndrome, Neuropsychological assessment
Pubmed
Web of science
Open Access
Yes
Create date
06/10/2023 9:10
Last modification date
07/10/2023 6:58
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