Undergraduate training in breaking bad news: A continuation study exploring the patient perspective.

Details

Serval ID
serval:BIB_8ABB10E717CE
Type
Article: article from journal or magazin.
Collection
Publications
Institution
Title
Undergraduate training in breaking bad news: A continuation study exploring the patient perspective.
Journal
Psycho-oncology
Author(s)
Carrard V., Bourquin C., Stiefel F., Schmid Mast M., Berney A.
ISSN
1099-1611 (Electronic)
ISSN-L
1057-9249
Publication state
Published
Issued date
02/2020
Peer-reviewed
Oui
Volume
29
Number
2
Pages
398-405
Language
english
Notes
Publication types: Journal Article
Publication Status: ppublish
Abstract
This paper reports on the continuation of an initial study that demonstrated the effectiveness, as rated by experts, of an undergraduate training in breaking bad news (BBN) using simulated patient (SP) and individual feedback. The current study aimed to further explore whether such an individualized training approach also has positive effects from the perspective of the patient, using the analogue patient (AP) methodology.
A subsample of 180 videotaped interviews with SPs were selected from the existing data set (N = 332), consisting of 60 pre- and post-training interviews of students benefiting from the individualized approach (intervention group) and 60 post-training interviews of students having small-group SP training and collective supervision (comparison group). Sixty-eight APs-healthy untrained observers-were asked to view the videotaped interviews while "putting themselves in the patient's shoes" and evaluate satisfaction, trust, liking, and the competence of medical students.
The intervention group students improved significantly from pre- to post-training on several dimensions evaluated by the APs: patient satisfaction, trust in the student, liking of the student, and perceived medical competence. Increased AP satisfaction was related to different changes in students' communication behavior between pre- and post-training: increase in positive talk, emotional responsiveness, biomedical and psychosocial information, and biomedical counseling. There was no significant between-group difference at post-training.
AP evaluation showed significant improvement between pre- and post-training. This result provides additional and complementary evidence of the positive effects of individualized training in BBN from the AP perspective, a proxy of (real) patients.
Keywords
Breaking bad news, Cancer, Communication training, Medical students, Oncology, Patient outcome, breaking bad news, cancer, communication training, medical students, oncology, patient outcome
Pubmed
Web of science
Create date
11/11/2019 18:56
Last modification date
18/02/2020 7:20
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